Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

9 articles on this Page

EI-ITGSEE OF NEWS. £ ---

AGRICULTURE. --+-

WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

DEATH OF CAPTAIN BECHER.

TERMINATION OF THE STRIKE…

[No title]

iXTRACTS PEOM " PUJSTOH "…

BRUTAL CONDUCT OF A POLICEMAN.

News
Cite
Share

BRUTAL CONDUCT OF A POLICEMAN. John Cochrane, twenty, was charged at the South- wark Police-court with being drunk and assaulting Police-constable Norton, and Margaret Heming was, charged with aiding and abetting in the assault. When the case was heard on Wednesday last, Coch- rane appeared with his head cut. Norton deposed to there having been a row in Kent-street, and when he interfered Cochrane knocked him down. They were, he swore, surrounded by thieves and ruffians, and he; only used his staff in self-defence.—Police-constables Graves, Sarger, and Hayes confirmed this testimony. -Edward Price, whose head was much cut and his arm broken, stated that he was inKent-street- on the evening in question, and saw Constable Norton attack Cochrane in a brutal manner without any cause. He knocked him down, and hit him on the head several-times with his staff, and when witness went up and asked mm not to murder the young man, he made a thrust at him with his truncheon, and another constable struck him on the head and arm, and he fell down insensible. When he recovered he found hiinself in Gay's Hospital with his arm broken. He believed Norton was the man who struck him.-Four witnesses, two of whom were women, looking on at the disturbance from the shops in the street, stated that the police had behaved with unnecessary violence, and that the witness Price had onlv interfered to prevent further injury to Cochrane. Maude said his opinion was that Cochrane had. brought a great deal of mischief on himself by getting drunk, but as he had been so cruelly knocked about he should discharge him and his companion also. In doinfr so, however, he could not help saying that. the constable Norton's conduct was brutal and extremely intemperate, and there was nothing to justuy him in using his truncheon in such a murderous way. The police commissioners will take what course they may think proper against him. —♦— —

[No title]