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FEARFUL COLLIERY ACCIDENT.

CHARGE OF INGENIOUS CONSPIRACY…

AGRICULTURAL EXHIBITION AT…

. CHEATING THE RAILWAY COMPANIES…

A STRANGE CONFLICT.

EXTRAORDINARY CASE OF MISTAKEN…

A -3 TSW-BORN INFANT PLACED…

PROSPECTS OF THE PRESIDENTIAL…

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PROSPECTS OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. The New York Times has a lengthy article upon this subject, from which we extract the following:— For five mouths there had been no State elections previous to those which have just occurred in Vermont and Maine. The popular sentiment had nowhere been tested on any scale at all significant. Five months is a long period in a national crisis like this, and the strength of the war feeling last spring could be no guarantee of its present control. Two great cam- paigns have been prosecuted with varying fortunes, and one of them is still undecided. A call of unprece- dented magnitude had been made for more men. Gold had risen from 150 to 250. Taxes had been multiplied and doubled in weight. Peace plotters on the Canada border had set up their false lights, and demagogues at home had plied every art to deceive the people. The rebel armies, though on the whole worsted, were still full of fight; the Richmond Government showed not the slightest sign of yielding: and the Southern people remained, to ail appearance, just as submissive to their leaders as ever. "But more than all this, new political events of great importance had taken place in the meantime. Presi- dent Lincoln had been renominated, to the dissatisfac- tion of some of the leading men of the Union party. General M'Clellan had received the unanimous nomi- nation of the Opposition, and had published his letter of acceptance, so carefully designed to hide the real issues and attract personal favour. It was a question of peculiar interest, then, how the new political campaign was to open. Would this open- ing indicate a popular content or discontent^ with the continued maintenance of the war ? For which of the two Presidential candidates would it show the popular preference? The two States moved, when the time came, in no doubtful way. The Union party in the one earned the day by 21,000 majority, in the other by 20,000, showing a large gain in eaoh since last year. This was the more signal in view of the fact that in neither case does thi; majority include the thousands of soldiers in the field, who are almost to a man on the side of the Union party. "These results show infallibly that the developments of the five months have only made the war party stronger than ever. The mere fact that those States have elected their Union tickets, is, in itself, we allow, nothing. That was a thing of course. Nobody drea,med that the hills of Vermont, which have always withstood like adamant the highest floods of the corrupt Democracy, would now topple over into all the abomi. nable vileness and venomousness of its drags. No] did anybody believe that Mains, which for years ha; been firm, would now go under. The significance is not that these States have not become Copperhead, but that they have even actually improved in their staunchness. We say it is a grand indication. It shows unmistakably the real popular temper of the time. Of that interest which is purely selfish, no two States have less for the salvation of the Union than Vermont and Maine. Their geographical positions, and the peculiar sources of their prosperity, make it a matter of very little consequence to them materially whether the South goes or stays. Again, they have both suffered from war more than most of the States, particularly Vermont. That little State, on account of the emigration of so many of its young men to the cities and to the West, has had to contribute a larger proportion to the armies; and these soldiers, as the record of the war show, have done more extensive and severe fighting than any equal number of regiments from any other Northern State. Nowhere has death been carried to so many homes by the destruction of this war. The Maine regiments, have been among the most active participants in the war, and have greatly suffered. It is no small thing, then, that two States, thus independently situated, and thus subjected to sacrifice, instead of wearying and succumbing under the prolongation of the war, should exhibit a sterner devotion to it than ever. The party which goes for a 'cessation of hostili- ties,' is blind if it fail to see in these first elections the sure indications of its coming fate. It has taken heart because of the noisy demonstrations of this and some other cities in favour of its candidate. But those demonstrations were almost entirely confined to a very different element from that which makes up the solid, native-born bone and muscle of the country. They are no exponent whatever of the principles and spirit which nerve the real American people. Not City elec- tions, but State elections, are the criteria of the senti- ment which rules the land. It always has been so; I and for a long while yet will continue to be so. The silent vote of the smallest State in the Union is a better index of the political future than any hurrahs would be in our public squares, even if loud enough to reach the moon. The simple fact is, that the great body of the intelligent people of this nation know that it cannot be saved, except by fighting this war to its end, and that they have the patriotism to so fight it through, at whatever cost or sacrifice. The Copper- heads may as well undertake to arrest the law of gra- vitation as to change this determination of the people. The effort will also result in their own overthrow and destruction."

ONLY A QUESTION OF MONEY.

BRUTAL ATTACK UPON A BOY.\

A YOUNG GENTLEMAN DROWNED.…

THE COLLIERS' STRIKE: A NUMBER…

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