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.......-,-FEARFUL EXPLOSION…

gREAT FIRE IN THE CITY.

THE DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION.

MR. NEWDEGATE, M.P., ON THE…

— f SHAKESPEARE'S PORTRAIT.

LETTER FROM MRS. STOWE.

A WATERSPOUT AT SEA.

DEATH OF THE EARL OF CADOGAN.

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MR, BAXTER AND HIS CONSTITUENTS.

LORD STANLEY ON IRISH EMIGRATION.

A POOR SOLDIER'S WIFE WORKING…

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WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

IMPROVEMENT IN CAVALRY STABLES.

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IMPROVEMENT IN CAVALRY STABLES. In the annual review of the progress of hygiene presented to the Army Medical Department by Professor Parkes, of the Army Medical School, and just issued, notice is taken of the recent report on cavalry stables made after an in- quiry into the subject by the Barrack Improvement Com- mission. The question is entirely solved whether or not the men should be placed over the stables. As regards the men, there was much to be said against this arrangement, but there was something to be urged for it. But the horse's health has turned the scale. The stables cannot be propeily ventilated or lighted if the men's rooms are over- head. In some of the cavalry stables examined the air was so foul that it was matter of surprise how animals could breathe it and retain any measure of health. In the old troop stables at Hounslow each successive horse, from the corners to the centre, is supplied with air fouled more and more by the other horses. Many animals would perish under the treatment inevit- able in the older class of cavalry stables but for two things -their daily exercise in the open air, and a certain habit which their constitutions acquire of resisting air poi- sons by continued exposure to their action but this resist- ing power of habit can only be trusted to temporarily, and inevitably ends in loss of health and life. If the horse is to be in health and strength he must have a free diffusion of the atmosphere, including absence of stagnation, abundance of light, good drainage, absence of nuisance, and sufficient space to live in. The inquiry has shown beyond question that the best form of building is a one-storeyed stable and only two rows of horses, the ventilation to be by the roof, and formed by a louvre 16 inches wide, carried from end to end, and giving four square feet of ventilating outlet for each horse. The stables recommended to be built in future would give each horse 100 feet of superfici",l and 1,605 cubic feet. A course of air-brick would be carried round at the eaves, giving one square foot of inlet to each horse; an air- brick is introduced, about six inches from the ground, in every two stalls; there is a swing window for every stall, and spaces are left below the doors. In this way, and by attention to surface drainage and roof lighting, it is antici- pated that stables will become perfectly healthy. In old stables ventilating shafts are to be carried up and air-bricks introduced. More window space is to be given. — *— —

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