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.......-,-FEARFUL EXPLOSION…

gREAT FIRE IN THE CITY.

THE DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION.

MR. NEWDEGATE, M.P., ON THE…

— f SHAKESPEARE'S PORTRAIT.

LETTER FROM MRS. STOWE.

A WATERSPOUT AT SEA.

DEATH OF THE EARL OF CADOGAN.

[No title]

MR, BAXTER AND HIS CONSTITUENTS.

LORD STANLEY ON IRISH EMIGRATION.

A POOR SOLDIER'S WIFE WORKING…

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A POOR SOLDIER'S WIFE WORKING AS A BOY. The following singular story is told in the Chicago papers: A boy, giving the name of Henry Goodwin, recently made application to the Briggs Ironworks, Lanesborough, for work, and, although they were not in need of help, he pleaded so hard that employment was finally given him. His superior intelligence, modesty, and freedom from profanity and coarseness, and his great industry, all conspired to win the favour of his employers, who spoke of it to several gentlemen of the village, who also became interested in his ap- pearance. Shortly after commencing work he was taken ill, and repaired to Munson's Hotel, where, in order to be apart from the other boarders, he had a bed in the garret. The care he received was not the best, and the patient grew rapidly worse, when a phy- sician was finally sent for, who wished to examine him, but, Henry objecting, the doctor did not insist. The next day the doctor found him insensible, and the case hopeless, and on examination discovered his patient was a woman. During the night the patient continued in- sensible, or deranged, and died in the morning. An inquest was held, at which it was ascertained that the deceased had worked for a Mr. Barton, at farming, then came to Pittsfield and worked for Amos Shepard- spn, farming, at 1 dol. 50c. a day, but left, as she could not do haying. She then applied for work at the ironworks in Lanesborough, and with the sad result narrated above. The Pittsfield Eagle says that every- where she conducted herself with extreme modesty and propriety, and showed- great industry. From letters found among her effects, she appears to have been the wife of Leeman Underhill, a soldier or officer in Battery D, 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, lately stationed at Fort Jackson, near New Orleans. The letters are addressed Dear Julia and Children.' The first ones speak of havjag sent her money, with some doubt in one case whether it was hscestly delivered. The late I ones spea'S, of want, not having been pa,id, sickness, &c., and at least intimate a request for more money. She sent money away at two different times at least— probably to her husband, and perhaps to her children, and there seems little doubt that she assumed her dis- guise in order to procure more remunerative pay, and died from over exertion for those she loved. A fine bowie knife, ground very sharp, was found among her effects, and was doubtless intended for defence against insult."

LIFE IN SAN FRANCISCO: FATAL…

WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

IMPROVEMENT IN CAVALRY STABLES.

[No title]