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.......-,-FEARFUL EXPLOSION…

gREAT FIRE IN THE CITY.

THE DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION.

MR. NEWDEGATE, M.P., ON THE…

— f SHAKESPEARE'S PORTRAIT.

LETTER FROM MRS. STOWE.

A WATERSPOUT AT SEA.

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A WATERSPOUT AT SEA. The barque Jane Doull, Captain Smith, which arrived in the Mersey last week from Bermuda, had an exceedingly narrow escape from destruction by a waterspout at sea. She left Bermuda on Sunday, August 14th, but, shortly after, the wind having fallen to a dead calm, came to anchor off the Great Sound. The evening (writes one of the passengers) was sultry and oppressive; not a breath of air rippled the water, or cooled the hot atmosphere. The sun travelled down the west, and disappeared like a great circular patch of blood be- hind a heavy bank of black clouds. The night was equally miserable—the heat intense the wind was dead, the broad expanding waters smooth as glass, and everything in nature seemed to denote some unusual phenomenon at hand. The morning came, but no change with it: clouds of various hue, but all sombre, grey and black tinged, chased and gathered beneath the sky. The sun rose a ball of fire, and loomed in the distance like a redhot 68-pounder spherical shot. No wind, no ripple, no sign of change except perhaps for the worse. At seven the clouds gathered thick and heavy, and far in the distance we could see rain beating down on the sea in lines of water. Our attention was soon diverted from the rain. Captain Smith and Mr. Virgin, the pilot, asked if we could not hear a distant roar as if there were a naval engagement going on at some short distance. A dull, rumbling roar could be distinctly heard. We next observed, about five miles from us, a cylindrical column reaching from the sea to the altitude of 500 feet. From our point of view it appeared about three feet in dia- meter it was of a greyish hue. It rested upon the water, and by the aid of our glasses we could distinctly observe the salt water ascending, and the fresh water descending in torrents—the sea in a state of great, agitation. Around this cylindrical column the winds seewedto fee rushing with the force of thQ volcano. A smaller one which appeared about this time was apparently "swallowed" by the larger one. For some fifteen minutes we watched this remarkable, and to us novel, phenomenon. The pilot then pronounced it a waterspout. As we had never seen one we felt no alarm till warned that if it struck the vessel we musi) save oturstelvea. While. we were yet conjecturing -kgt would t)e ths result of this extraordinary formation, the great line of black elouds solemnly advanced on each wing of the spout. The rain was pouring in wild torrents, and then the spout dropped down its mighty weight of water on the pitiless sea, while the winds madly rushed it towards us. We now became alarmed. The roar of the falling waters came to us like the distant sound of Niagara, the sea was lashed into great waves: the waters poured and bubbled and rose in swaying masses over six feet ia height. With deadly aim and certain purpose the awful column advanced. Not one on board the ship but felt the danger, and knew- that nothing could save us if it struck the ship. Thank God, it burst about thirty yards from us, and the last remnant of water ceased within but ten feet of the stern. The weather immediately cleared, a breeze sprang up, and the Jane Doull proceeded safely on her voyage.

DEATH OF THE EARL OF CADOGAN.

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MR, BAXTER AND HIS CONSTITUENTS.

LORD STANLEY ON IRISH EMIGRATION.

A POOR SOLDIER'S WIFE WORKING…

LIFE IN SAN FRANCISCO: FATAL…

WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

IMPROVEMENT IN CAVALRY STABLES.

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