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.......-,-FEARFUL EXPLOSION…

gREAT FIRE IN THE CITY.

THE DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION.

MR. NEWDEGATE, M.P., ON THE…

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MR. NEWDEGATE, M.P., ON THE HOWE OF COMMONS. The Warwickshire Agricultural Society held its annual meeting last week, at Coventry. At the usual dinner, in responding to the toast of "The County Members," Mr. Newdegate, M.P., expressed his great regret at the absence of Mr. Spooner. It had been thought that upon a recent occasion he represented a small minority. It was true that he did take a part which appeared isolated, but he represented the mass of opinion in what he did with respect to Denmark, as appeared by the result. He confessed that when that debate occurred he thought both parties in the wrong. Well, he certainly did take an isolated part, and it did appear to him that the House of Commons had grown a little old. It was old, according to the duration of Parliaments. He left the House with a melancholy sense that there was some truth in the carioatareof Punch, which represented John Bull in a state of plethora, not to say adolescent obesity—a sort of com- mercial Falstaff in top-hoots. His belief was this, that it was the fault of the Opposition that the Government did not interfere to stop the war;, and that if England had shown her ancient spirit in sup- port of her ally early enough, perhaps later, Denmark would not have suffered the oppression which he understood the great Powers, were now combined in order to relieve (hear, hear). Some people seemed to think that the House of Commons was a sort of moral backgammon-board, with an expert gambler seated on each side, and its members performing the mere function of counters. Others seemed to think that the House of Commons was little more than a municipal corporation. There had been two very opposite, and yet two very graphic descriptions of what people understood by the House of Commons. One of them was contained in the speech of Mr. Roebuck. He presented to the public a just estimate of what were the duties, the functions, and what should be the functions of the House of Commons; for although designated by the names of the places they represented, they were members for all England, representing the people of England and the vast intelligence which the term conveyed. The constitution cf England was re- formed when our church was purified at the reformation. The constitution of England was based upon the principle of the freedom of the people, but a freedom regulated by adherence to the only true source of freedom—that pure morality which was to be found only in the Gospel. All throughout the institutions of England were founded on that principle. In the House of Commons it was represented directly; in the oaths taken by the Peers was found a recognition of the same principle; while the Sovereign who sat upon the throne, held her crown, her indemnity from all per- sonal liability, on the condition that she adhered to that pure morality which was found only in the Gospel. Hence the vast difference between the Governments of England and of France. England has never suffered a social revolution, for England was Protestant long before the Reformation. France, on the contrary, had suffered a social revolution-the revolution preceding the commencement of this cen- tury, and a social revolution casts back a nation, so far as regards the power of self-government, into a second childhood. Then France had never yet been able to reach the point at which our freedom com- menced. He saw before him two clergymen of the Church ef Rome. He spoke openly to every inhabi- tant of North Warwickshire. Perhaps they would scarcely believe him when he told them that his first tutor-a man he loved—was a Roman Catholic. He was a Catholic, and the stronger Protestant because he was so. He hoped he should be forgiven for touching upon deeper subjects; but he believed that he represented not merely the Toryism, not merely the Conservatism of the House of Commons, but the justification for the Liberalism, as it was called, of those opinions which had hitherto guarded our freedom while they preserved order, and maintained the balance of the constitution by regulating the great powers with which it had been the pleasure of the people of England to invest the House of Commons.

— f SHAKESPEARE'S PORTRAIT.

LETTER FROM MRS. STOWE.

A WATERSPOUT AT SEA.

DEATH OF THE EARL OF CADOGAN.

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MR, BAXTER AND HIS CONSTITUENTS.

LORD STANLEY ON IRISH EMIGRATION.

A POOR SOLDIER'S WIFE WORKING…

LIFE IN SAN FRANCISCO: FATAL…

WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

IMPROVEMENT IN CAVALRY STABLES.

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