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FEABFUL COLLIERY EXPLOSION'.

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATHS AT MILE-END.

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ITERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION IN…

I EFFORTS TO ESTABLISH PEACE…

RAISING THE SUNKEN STEAMER…

DEATH OF THE DUKE OF CLEVELAND.

TAKING LEAVE OF A CONVICTED…

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DEATH OF TWO FEMALES FROM…

A PANIC IN THE ADELPIII THEATRE.

DOUBLE EXECUTION AT LEEDS.

A MATRIMONIAL DIFFICULTY:…

IFATAL ACCIDENT TO A YORK…

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FATAL ACCIDENT TO A YORK ARCHITECT. ( A very sudden and singular accident occurred last week at Church Feuton, at the brickyards belonging to Mr. Graham, of York, whereby one gentleman lost his life, and two other persons were more or less injured. On the premises was a large eight hole brick or tile kiln, capable of burning some 40,000 ordinary draining tiles, and this building had fallen somewhat out of repair. The manager of the works, William Palmer, communicated to his employer, Mr. Graham, the state of the building, and the latter gentleman promptly took measures to restore or rebuild the worn out structure. Accordingly on Wednesday afternoon he went to view the place, accompanied by Mr. John Hornsey, of York, architect. After spending a short time in looking at the place, Mr. Hornsey proceeded to make his measurement, preparatory to drawing his intended plan for re-building the place, and for that purpose went inside the kiln. With him were Mr. Graham, Palmer (the manager), and his son, and also a labourer, named Cawthorne. Mr. Hornsey mounted a ladder and proceeded to take the dimensions of the spring of the aich, and while he was so occupied, and without the slightest premonitory warning, tha roof fell in with a frightful crash. At the entrance to the kiln was found Palmer's son, jammed by the legs between a wheelbarrow and the wall. In the right corner of the kiln, up to the waist in fallen bricks, stood the labourer Cawthorne, his face streamilig with blood from wounds in the head. He had noticed the building giving way, and had just time to jump into a corner, and thus escape certain death. As it is, the wounds a.re very severe, and he is in a very dangerous state. Groans were now heard in another corner of the kiln, and after a lapse of nearly a quarter of an hour, Mr. Hornsey was taken from the ruins. About forty minutes after he had been rescued, and before the arrival of the medical officers, he breathed his last. The deceased's injuries were of the most frightful description. His skull was beaten in in more than one place, and his jaws, about the mouth, dreadfully torn and lacerated. His right thigh, his right knee, and right leg were shockingly mangled, and his right arm was broken. It is also believed that he had sustained fracture of the ribs, besides severe internal injuries. Mr. Hornsey followed the profession of an architect, and was most highly respected, and his untimely death will be regretted by a large circle of friends. ♦ —

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