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FEABFUL COLLIERY EXPLOSION'.

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATHS AT MILE-END.

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ITERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION IN…

I EFFORTS TO ESTABLISH PEACE…

RAISING THE SUNKEN STEAMER…

DEATH OF THE DUKE OF CLEVELAND.

TAKING LEAVE OF A CONVICTED…

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DEATH OF TWO FEMALES FROM…

A PANIC IN THE ADELPIII THEATRE.

DOUBLE EXECUTION AT LEEDS.

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DOUBLE EXECUTION AT LEEDS. On Saturday morning tha two men Myers and Sar- gisson underwent the extreme penalty of the law in front of the gaol at Leeds. They were both convicted of wilful murder at the last assizes (being the first ever held in Leeds), the former for the murder of his wife at Sheffield, and the latter for the murder of John Cooper, at Roche Abbey. The chief witness against Myers was his own daughter, who saw him cut her mother's throat with a table knife. In the case of Sargisson's victim, who was a poor gardener, the watch and other property was found in the cottage of the murderer, who endeavoured, while admitting having witnessed the murder, to fix the actual com- mission of the deed on another man, who had also been indicted, but had been released on the grand jury ignoring the bill. Sargisson maintained to the last that he was not the murderer of Cooper. He said, after being urged to confess, "If I could say anything that would free him (the other man, Denton) from suspicion, I would, but he is guilty. He struck the blow." No hope of pardon or respite has been held out to either of the condemned men by any of the officials of the gaol, or by the relatives and others with whom they have had interviews, nor have they themselves even suggested the possibility of their receiving any commutation of their sentence. From the time of their condemnation both men showed a befitting sense of their awful position, and listened V(_ attentively to the instruction afforded them. This was more especially the case with the younger of the two criminals, Sargisson. 'On Saturday week the Bishop of Ripon arrived unexpectedly at Armley Gaol, where the condemned men were confined, and had an interview of an hour's duration with each of them. The preparations for the carrying out the sen- tences were commenced 'on Friday, and every step was taken for the preservation of order. The scaffold was taken for the preservation of order. The scaffold was erected at the north-east angle of the gaol enclosure, access to it for the condemned men, the chaplain, the under-sheriff, the governor; and other officials, being provided for by the formation of a doorway in the masonry of the wall near to the turnkey's residence. The scaffold was nine feet from the ground, the front of it screened with black cloth, which concealed the bodies of the unfortunate men from the waist down- wards. In front of the wall and at some distance from the scaffold on either side strong barricades were erected, and a powerful force of police was employed in the preservation of order among the many thou- sands of spectators who were present. Both the unhappy men went to bed between twelve and one o'clock. The governor went to Sargisson about five o'clock in the morning and found him lying in the bed still with his clothes on. He was reading his Bible. The governor then went to Myers about half-past six. He was asleep, but on being awakened he rose up, and producing a small piece of paper which he had in his hand said, "These are two sixpences which Mr. Godson has promised to give my children." Mr. Under-sheriff William Gray arrived at a quarter- past eight. Askern, the executioneer, was also present at that time. The mob had begun to collect at four o'clock, and at the time of the execution there could not. have been less than 120,000 persons present. When the prison clock struck nine, the cry of H-its off! was raised by the multitude. The under-sheriff and Mr. Keene were followed by the chaplain, repeating the Funeral Service.. Myers came up first, then Sargisson, both appearing pale and anxious-looking. They knelt upon the drop whilst Mr. Tuckwell read the Burial Service. Both the culprits uttered the responses, and frequently ejacu- lated, "Lord, have mercy upon me," and "Lord, save my soul." Myers appeared quiet, but Sargisson shook his head heavily. Both the men continued to cry out, "Lord, have mercy upon me!" and the last words uttered by Sargisson were to his brother murderer. He called out, Are you happy, lad ? I am happy!" to which Myers responded, "Indeed I am." The drop fell, and the bodies were immediately hidden from the view of the crowd, and it was only from the vibration of the rope that Myers seemed to die almost imme- diately but the other man struggled violently for the next few minutes. Sargisson to the last adhered to the statement that he had made throughout. The crowd then commenced rapidly dispersing, though a large number remained to witness the cutting down of the bodies at ten o'clock. The arrangements for the preservation of order were carried out with great dis- cretion by Mr. Bell, the chief constable. So large a number of visitors to witness this melan- choly spectacle may be accounted for by this being the first execution since the division of the West Riding, Leeds being the appointed place for the final consummation of the law. A most shocking scene occurred immediately after the drop fell. It appears that a short time previous to the execution attention was directed to a wound in Myers's throat, and one of the warders placed a small plaster 'upon it. This, however, was not sufficient.. A few days before the execution Myers alluded to the state of his throat, and said that if the executioner did not give him "another yard" of fall he should not die, for he could breathe through the wound. He showed to the person he addressed that he. could actually respire through the wound. The wound was in the middle of his throat, and the rope would necessarily come above it, so that there was imminent danger of a horrible scene unless the place was securely plastered over. The event showed that proper means had not been taken to obviate this danger. The fall did not dislocate his neck, because of his weight, but it was sufficiently violent to tear open the wound, and a dreadful scene ensued. After one or two movements Myers ceased apparently to struggle, and the attention of the executioner was directed to Sargisson, who struggled violently, and seemed to die very hard. But after a minute had elapsed it was seen that Myers was still alive, and that breathing was going on through the wound in the throat below the rope. The dreadful occurrence caused an overpowering feeling of horror, but, after a consultation with the surgeon, steps were taken which resulted in the eventual fulfilment of the sentence; but this was not accomplished until more than twenty minutes had expired after the drop fell. Whether sensibility remained in the body during the whole of that time it is impossible to say. Certain, however, it is that the culprit breathed for that time, and that the hoarse sound of the air rushing into the lungs was distinctly audible.

A MATRIMONIAL DIFFICULTY:…

IFATAL ACCIDENT TO A YORK…

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