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FEABFUL COLLIERY EXPLOSION'.

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATHS AT MILE-END.

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ITERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION IN…

I EFFORTS TO ESTABLISH PEACE…

RAISING THE SUNKEN STEAMER…

DEATH OF THE DUKE OF CLEVELAND.

TAKING LEAVE OF A CONVICTED…

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TAKING LEAVE OF A CONVICTED MURDERER. An Affecting Seene. The Sheffield Telegraph of last week publishes the following concerning the murderer, Myers :—As some misconception has arisen respecting the mood of mind in which the prisoner now is, we have much satisfac- tion in placing before our readers an account derived from the best authority of his present condition. Stories, founded on his previously callous behaviour, and on reports furnished by persons who judge of him from casual notice of his demeanour under observation, have represented the doomed man as behaving with shocking levity and stolid indifference to the conse- quences of his position. On Monday last his family were admitted to see him in prison; and from the results of their observations and inquiries, we are enabled to state the following facts; He neither smokes nor drinks, he is thin and attenuated in body, anxious of mind, and docile in manner. So far from pampering himself in diet and eatisg his food with relish, he alleges that he has found his appetite para- lysed by the condition of his mind; and his wan and wasted appearance would seem to countenance his assertion. On Monday he had an interview with his sister, his son-in-law, his son. and his two young chil- dren. One of the first remarks he made was in the form of a question which exhibited his desire to miti- gate the sdium under which he labours, and to leave behind him a better impression in the minds of his family. It is said there is no man so good but he has in him some elements of badness and no man so bad, but if you come to know him well, you will find in him some traces of goodness; and this observation, which is borne out by those who have carefully observed the conduct of liberated convicts in Australia and else- where, is also confirmed by the conduct of Myers. He asked his son pointedly, and with much eagerness, whether he thought the murder premeditated; the son answered that he thought it was. This answer took him aback, and visibly troubled him; and he said, extenuatingly, "I can't help what you think; I was not myself; I was not my own man." He blames the drink, and is convinced that but for that he would never have been in the solemn position he now occupies. Herein, he probably reasons rightly. The physical derangement produced by hard drinking excites, as many of our readers will have seen, an almost uncon- trollable irritability of both body and mind, and, coupled with a deepening sense of demoralisation and a consciousness of self-caused misery and degradation, makes its victims sour in temper, surly of mood, and as reckless of the lives of others as they are of an existence which has ceased to have any value for themselves, He spent some little time arranging his affairs, ap- portioning his fishing-rods, his money, and his tools, after which an affecting scene occurred. His youngest child was asked, "Would you like to live with your father?" "Not here," said the child. "If father could fetch mother back we'd go and live at home again." At this touching allusion Myers broke down, tears rolled down his face, and he was for some time convulsed with grief. The simple language of the child—simple as truth and innocence could make it- brought back to him the good that had been, the good that might have been, and the affection of a. wife whose love had survived the worst abuses; and he remained for some time almost choking with emotion. Turning to his son-in-law, he said, Can you forgive me ?" The son-in-law, seeing his penitence, said he thought he could. Turning next to his son he asked the same question. The son, moved by his contrition, replied that he also could now forgive him. This answer had an electrical effect. With fa.ce all quivering, and tears streaming down his features in beads, he grasped the hands of his son with spasmodic energy, and said, in a voice husky with feeling, "Now I can die content." The gaolers, accustomed as they are to solemn scenes, were moved by this uncommon exhibition of passionate penitence, and they also were in tears. He complains that he should have been described as hardened beyond feeling. He says that if he could have cried, as some people can, he would not have been so thin and wan as he now is. He is deeply grateful to the governor and officers of the prison for the attention they have shown him, saying, "That had he been a child of their own he could not have been more kindly treated by them." He was much consoled by the results of the meeting with his friends and family, declaring that before he saw them life was valueless and death unacceptable; but that since he had seen them, and been assured of their forgiveness, he should meet death with perfect resignation. He spoke of the Condemned Sermon" as a beautiful dis- course, and with the renewed expressions of gratitude to, and good-will for, all around him, ended an inter- view which had been at once one of the most mournful and most moving that ever occurred within prison walls. »

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DEATH OF TWO FEMALES FROM…

A PANIC IN THE ADELPIII THEATRE.

DOUBLE EXECUTION AT LEEDS.

A MATRIMONIAL DIFFICULTY:…

IFATAL ACCIDENT TO A YORK…

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