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FEABFUL COLLIERY EXPLOSION'.

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATHS AT MILE-END.

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ITERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION IN…

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RAISING THE SUNKEN STEAMER…

DEATH OF THE DUKE OF CLEVELAND.

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DEATH OF THE DUKE OF CLEVELAND. The new Duke of Cleveland died last week at Raby Castle, near Durham, having only succeeded his brother the late Duke in January last. William John Frederick Vane, third Dake of Cleve. land. Marquis of Cleveland, Earl of Darlington and Viscount Barnard, Baron Raby, of Raby Castle, in the Bishopric of Durham, was born in London April 3, 1792, and was the second son of William Henry, third Earl of Darlington, K.G., Lord-Lieutenant and Vice- Admiral of Durham (who was created Marquis of Cleveland September 17,1827, and Duke of Cleveland and Baron Raby January 15, 1833), by Lady Katharine Margaret Powlett, second daughter and co-heiress of Henry sixth and last Baron Bolton. He assumed the name of Powlett on inheriting his mother's property, and was for many years familiar to the sportsmen of England as Lord William Powlett. He resumed his paternal name of Vane by Royal licence, shortly after succeeding to the dukedom. He received the degree of M.A. of Oxford in 1812 was M.P. for St. Ives 1846-52, and for Ludlow 1852-7, taking, however, no active part in the debates of the Lower House. He married, July 3, 1815, Lady Catherine Lowther, daughter of William, first Earl of Lonsdale, but had no issue by his marriage. Lord William Powlett began his racing career some- what late in life. His father was a shrewd and intel- ligent sportsman, who was said to be half Scotchman, half Manchester-man. His grace was owner of the famous racers Barefoot, Memnon, and Mulev Moloch. As a fox-hunter he was commemorated, and still lives in the famous song, "The hounds of old Raby for me"— They are Darlington's sure, for his voice I well know, Crying "'forward; hark, forward," from Shelbrook's below. And in another Bong- With persuaders in flank comes Darlington's peer, With his chin stretching- out, and his cap on one ear." Lord William, as he wa^ called, was not unworthy of his father. His first victory was in the Somerset- shire, with Brandyface. His Sharavogue won five Queen's plates; but he expected great things from Promised Land, which expectations, unfortunately, were disappointed. Tim Whiffler was his great card, and won the Royal Stand Plate at Ascot, the Good- wood Cup, the Doncasfcer Cap, and the Doncaster Stand Cup. As Lord William owned some consider- able portion of Bath (Puiteney and other fashionable streets included), he always sent his horses to the races there. He was a steward of the Jockey Club, and was most liberal as an owner of horses, and as a landlord at Downham. His grace is succeeded in his titles and vast estates by his only surviving brother, Lord Harry George Vane, M.P. for Hastings, who was born April 19, 1803; was educated at Oriel College, Oxford; and married, August 2, 1854, Lady Catherine Lucy Wil- helmine Stanhope, Viscountess Dalmenv, daughter of the fourth Earl Stanhope. Lord H. Vane was attached to the Embassy at Paris, 1829; was Secretary of Lega- tion at Stockholm, in 1839; sat for South Durham, in the Liberal interest, from 1841 to 1859, when, on his brother Henry, Duke of Cleveland, supporting the Derby Ministry, he was not re-elected, and was re- turned for Hastings. He had purchased Battle Abbey from the Webster family. As the present duke has no family, the heir-presumptive is Mr. Henry Morgan Vane, born November 29, 1808, who, by his marriage in 1853 with Louisa, daughter of the Rev. R. Farrer, has three sons, who may perpetuate this famous title.

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