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FEABFUL COLLIERY EXPLOSION'.

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATHS AT MILE-END.

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ITERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION IN…

I EFFORTS TO ESTABLISH PEACE…

RAISING THE SUNKEN STEAMER…

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RAISING THE SUNKEN STEAMER CHEVY CHASE. The operations for raising the Chevy Chase steamer, sunk in the Elbe, by the representatives of Lloyd's, are exciting a considerable amount of interest. The Chevy Chase was a new steam-ship, about 600 tons, beipnging to the General Steam Navigation Company, valued at £ 50,000. In going up the Elbe in the early part of the ye%r she got foul of some ice, which stove her bows and she sunk. The spot wheie she went down is about twenty miles from Hamburg, lying across the stream with her head in shore. At low tide there are twenty feet of water over the deck aft and ten feet forward. There is a rise of fifteen feet in the flood, the tides sweeping over the ship at the rate of four or five knots an hour. There is not more than ten minutes' slack for working purposes-this is at low water. It was in consequence of the rapid now of water over the vessel that the raising of the ship was rendered so difficult. One of the company's _masters, Captain Frost, succeeded with some divers in repair- ing the steamer's bows, but the difficulty was to get buoyancy so as to float her, and, with twenty feet of water over the decks, it seemed insurmountable. Then again a second accident befel the ship, another of her plates got stove near her fore sponson, which will have to be made secure before any attempts can be made to raise her. In this dilemma the directors of e com- pany came to a resolution to place the vessei hi the hands of Lloyd's Salvage Association, who, after causing a careful survey of the wreck, proposed a plan for accomplishing the rescue of the vessel, which was at once accepted, and instructed Captain Russell to set about carrying. i out. The operations, however, have been somewhat tedious. The sunken steamer is now enclosed in a coffer-dam, consisting of wooden balks, twelve inches thick and sixty feet long, driven into the bed of the river ten or ¡ twelve feet. The dam is cased with strong water-tight canvas sheeting. Divers were employed to secure the lower end of the sheeting to the bottom of the piles, heavy bags of clay and stone being placed in it to keep it at the bottom, secured to the bed of the riv.er. Five steam pumps will be set in motion to pump out the water from the dam, so as to get in the stove plate near the sponson. This movement accomplished, the engines will knock off pumping, and will be employed to pump out the ship so as to float her. Beams and other appliances have been erected across the dam to secure it from collapsing. Captain Russell, in a tele- gram he dispatched from Hamburg to the General Steam Navigation Company, states that he intends to commence pumping as soon as the high wind ceases, aud hopes to get the ship afloat in a few days. The operations have at present involved an outlay of nearly < £ 12,000. f,' f

DEATH OF THE DUKE OF CLEVELAND.

TAKING LEAVE OF A CONVICTED…

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DEATH OF TWO FEMALES FROM…

A PANIC IN THE ADELPIII THEATRE.

DOUBLE EXECUTION AT LEEDS.

A MATRIMONIAL DIFFICULTY:…

IFATAL ACCIDENT TO A YORK…

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