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FEABFUL COLLIERY EXPLOSION'.

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATHS AT MILE-END.

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ITERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION IN…

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TERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION IN LIN- COLNSHIRE. Nearly Half a Village Burnt. About ton o'clock on Friday morning a fire, attended I' with most disastrous results, broke out at Sillingham, near Tatterahall. It was first discovered at the corner of the main street leading to Lincoln, on the roof of a thatched hovel, in a -yard belonging to a man named William Scott, wood dealer. The wind at the time was blowing quite a gale from the west, and the sparks flew in all directions. The flames quickly extended to the remaining building in the yard, and thence the burning straw was blown upon a thatched cottage and outbuildings belonging to Robert Newton, a car- rier between Sleaford and Lincoln. The building was completely gutted, as well as the stable and cart- house, with other buildings adjoining. The flames next communicated to a brick and thatch cottage, which was levelled with the ground in a few minutes, all the furniture being destroyed. The flames then extended across the road in an easterly direction, and two brick and thatch cottages were quickly on fire, and were soon consumed, with nearly all their con- tents. In tha rear was a quantity of grain buildings and produce, none of which escaped. The flames then appeared to make a sudden leap, and reiched a row of cottages across another street. One of these in the occupation of Robert Wilson and another of John Stevenson were in complete ruins, as well as many useful farm-buildings in the rear an out-stack hovel and pig-stye, belonging to Charles Croft, were also consumed." The most serious loss, however, was that of Thomas Gilbert. The house was a substantial stone i building, with thatched roof, which had recently snder- f gone extensive repairs; nothing but the wails remain. In the yard were two oat stacks, two hay stacks, three straw stacks, stables, and other outbuildings, none of which escaped, and it was only with the greatest pos- sible difficulty thet an adjoining stack-yard was saved. The Primitive Methodist Chapel opposite was also burnt out, as well as a cottage in the ocupatio11 of Wi liam Gadsby, and the produce of two acres of wheat; adjoining, a stack of wheat, the produce of four acres, belonging to William Sharp, was totally consumed, and the poor fellow was not insured. Be- yond this long list of terrible disasters a quantity of furniture was destroyed in removal-nearly all the hos.383 in the village in the immediate neighbourhood | of the fire being cleared. At the spot where the fire f originated, a fat pig, which the owner had given < £ 4 ( for a few days ago, was burnt to death, and at alil- other place three or four pigs were burnt. The hour at which the fire broke out was rather unfortunate, as most of the cottagers were out in the harvest field. As soon as the alarm was given they quickly returned, to ind the comfortable home they had left onl.' a few hours before a smoking mass of ruins. The Biiling- hay engine was quickly got out; but, owing to the long distance from which the water had to be fetched, it was some time before it could be made of much service. When, however, it commenced it proved very useful, and a messenger being sent to Tatterahall, soon arrived with their eagine, and, between the two, with other resources at hand, the spread of the fire was somewhat prevented. The high wind, however, did not allow of any help being rendered to the burning property, and it was only with the utmost exertions that the conflagration could be checked. Towards evening a mastery was obtained over it; and although the thatch and straw continue burning, it is hoped, if the wind abates, there will not be any farther out- break. The Las will fall very heavy upon the sufferers, few of whom are insured, and, as they are generally of the poorer class, the catastrophe is most distressing. Nearly one hundred men, women, and children have to be accommodated with temporary lodgings in the village schoolroom, and their sufferings must be very great for some time, as they ha e lost their little all. It is to be hoped that steps will be promptly taken to afford them temporary relief. The best possible order prevailed, the local police rendering efficient service, and nearly every man, woman, and child in the village t rned out to give assistance.

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