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The Siege of Charleston.

The Situation in Tennessee.

,The Mexican Question.

PREVENTION. OF INFANTICIDE.

EXTRACTING A-BATS TEETH. !

DEATH OF THE MARQUIS OF HUNT'LY.

THE RUSSIAN REPLY TO ENGLAND.

JENNY BIND AT A HARVEST .FESTIVAL.

WHOLESALE SMUGGLING WROM HEM:…

| GREEK FIRE.

DEATH OF THE RIGHT HON. EDWARD…

DEATH ON THE ROAD.

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; A DVEL BETWEEN TWO LADIES.

THE SUICIDE OF A YOUNG MAN…

; MR. DISRAELI ON HARVEST…

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MR. DISRAELI ON HARVEST HOMES. One of those popular annual gatherings called "Harvest Homos," which are now so generally sssplacing the old harvest suppers, was recently celebrated in Buckinghamshire, on the grounds of Rayners, near Penr., the seat of Philip Rose, Esq., who had kindly given- them up for the occasion. The festival was confined to the surrounding districts, embracing;-portions of High Wycombe and Penn, and commenced with a thanksgiving service for the bountiful harvest at the district chsEtrch of St. Marg-aret," a.t eleven o'clock. The labourers on the different farms were met oil coming. out of chisroh hy the militia band, and marched in procession to a tent erected at Rayners, out* a beautiful spot commanding an almost bound- less; prospect, where- a substantial dinner had been provided for- them by their different em- ployers. The grorurIdswere afterwards thrown open toi.the public, and cricket, football, and Aunt Sally formed the staple amusements until four o'clock, when a tea-meeting, was heM in the tent foe: the wives and families of the labourers of the district, at; which between 500 and 600 were entertained, in,addition to a large assemblage of the gentry said clergy from the surrotisding neighbourhood, including Mr. and; Mrs. Disraeli, Lord and Lady Ourzon, Miss Cmon, Eev. T. Evetts, &c. The ■meeting was presided, over by Mr. Eose. After pro- posing the health of the Queen, the chairman ealled upon Mr. Disraeli to propose the next toast. Mr. Disraeli spoke as follews :—My good friends, • I have great pleasure in congratulating yon- on the termination, of your harvest. I beliew I may say that, on-the Chiltern Hills, a finer harvest jhas never been reaped. We have not only had splendid crops of wheat, golden barley, and exu- berant oats, b?ifc we have> accompanied with these advantages, the finest crop of turnips that I can ever recollect to have seen, and such a conjugation, I believe, is very rare. You have to-day wisely and properly expressed, to the Giver of all good things your sense of these blessings. You are now assembled finder this tent to express ibelingp of a different kind, but whieh in their order are equally becoming to you. These meetings, somewhat new m our manners in this country, as?e cal- culated, I think, to produce very great advan- tages; and one of the principal benefits which they do bring about is, that they cause all classes in the agricultural world to mix and meet together. Here the landlord, the farmer, and the etiltivator of the soil — the British labourer, meet, bound together by a sympathy of feeling, and all equally rejoicing in the honourable and honest fulfilment of their labours; for the year. I shall take this opportunity of proposing to you to drink the health of the £ b»st class of the agricultural hier- archy, the landlords; because I know that nothing could be more. agreeable to the landlords of this parish than to, feel that they possess and are entitled to the good feelings of those among whom they live. On the present occasion I shall couple with that toast the name of a landlord who unfortunately does not live among us, Lord Howe (cheers). Superior claims in other parts of the country prevent his being a resident in Penn; but although he is not a resident here is known to ■ all, and known to many by the signs of his bounty and public usefulness. Although not amongst us we have at least this consolation, you who reside in this parish, that he is represented by his son, Lord Curzon. You know that every duty of a land" lord is admirably filled by Lord Howe. This is proved by the church, the school, and the cottage; all of which may be remarked by every one who know the neighbourhood. I, therefore, take the opportunity which you give me of proposing that you should drink The Health of the Landlords of this Parish, coupling with that-toast the name of Lord Howe." Speeches were also delivered by Lord Cttrzon, the Eev. Mr. Power, and other gentlemen. The festivities were afterwards enlivened with country dances and Sir Roger de Coverley, in which all 'classes joined on the lawn in the front of the mansion. —

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