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The Siege of Charleston.

The Situation in Tennessee.

,The Mexican Question.

PREVENTION. OF INFANTICIDE.

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PREVENTION. OF INFANTICIDE. At a meetingjately held at 18, Craven-street,. Strand, in furtherance of the formation of the National So- ciety and Asylum for the Prevention of Infanticide, Dr. ISTiel occupied the chair. The chairman briefly opened the proceedings by observing that a few days ago a preliminary meeting of gentlemen had been held with a view of checking the growing evil of infanticide, and it was resolved that an association should be formed which would combine the benefits of an asylum and of a model reformatory for the mother and her offspring-, where she would have shelter until able to return to her occupation. Mr. Dawson (the honorary secretary) said he had received a number of letters approving- of the move- ment. Letters had also been received from Mrs. Baines and other ladies, and it was. proposed that a ladies' committee should be formed. At the meeting referred to it was proposed that the members should put their views upon the subject into a, paper for the purpose of creating a discussion. He had already received several papers on the subject. Mr. Edwards next read a paper advocating the ad- mittance of both mother and child into the Foundling Hospital, as it was notorious that in the hospitals of Paris and Vienna, 50 per cent. of the children died in consequence of separation from their mothers. He was of opinion that the miserable 2s. 6d. per week should be exchanged for substantial and continual support, and in case the money could not be obtained from the pockets of the seducers it should be taken out of their skins. Mr. Wall said he attended on behalf of the Society for the Preservation of Infant Life, which had been formed by the working classes some few months ago. The working classes were greatly interested in the question. Through the influence of the Society forty 1 petitions had been presented to Parliament, and more would be presented in the ensuing session, praying for an inquiry into the bastardy laws. The Society had been promised the support of several members of Parliament. Having the same object in view as the promoters of the present meeting, the Society would be most happy to co-operate with them.. Dr. Burke Eyan said it was a matter of congratu- lation that the working classes had taken this move- ment up. He believed that houses for females were indispensable, but it was a delicate subject and beset with difficulties. Mr. Dawson said their dbiecf was to prevent child- murder as much as p ssibl r and he proposed the appointment of an omcer-to assist the police- in bringing the guilty parties to justice. The motion having been seconded, a long discussion ensued, in which Dr. Worthington, Mr. Safford, Mr. j Charlesworth, and others took: part. Evexitixally there- solution was withdrawn, as it was considered premature until the details of the propcsed society had been settled. A committee of ladies was next appointed, and the meeting was adjourned until October, when the rules, list of presidents, and several papers will be submitted, and some definite plan of action decided upon.

EXTRACTING A-BATS TEETH. !

DEATH OF THE MARQUIS OF HUNT'LY.

THE RUSSIAN REPLY TO ENGLAND.

JENNY BIND AT A HARVEST .FESTIVAL.

WHOLESALE SMUGGLING WROM HEM:…

| GREEK FIRE.

DEATH OF THE RIGHT HON. EDWARD…

DEATH ON THE ROAD.

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; A DVEL BETWEEN TWO LADIES.

THE SUICIDE OF A YOUNG MAN…

; MR. DISRAELI ON HARVEST…

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