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The Siege of Charleston.

The Situation in Tennessee.

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The Situation in Tennessee. The New York Herald correspondent, writing from Stevenson, Alabama, says:- "Information has been received here which indi- cates that the rebels are moving north from Chattanooga, with some purpose as yet unex- plained. Indeed, the report has not yet been con- firmed; but it has received such serious con- sideration that this army has been halted in its operations until the truth or falsity of the report can be well established. The orders for the move- ment of Crittenden's corps, which was to have been made to-day, have been countermanded, and it yet remains in the Sequatchie valley, within supporting distance of Burnsine, whose left is in the vicinity of Kingston. Crittenden's left is at Pikeville. You will notice that there is a gap of forty-five or fifty miles between the two armies, filled up by roving bands of cavalry and a courier line. This gap is a mountain, which is called Walden's Ridge of the Cumberland.' Burnside's right is in front of Knoxville, on the Clinch river. His army is therefore about ninety miles, through a wide, rich valley, from Chattanooga. liosecrans' army is about thirty miles, through a very rough, mountainous region, from Chattanooga. He is fifty miles fjrom the railroad which represents on the map the rebel line of retreat southward. With the two armies thus situated there are reasons why this as yet undefined rumour is rather startling. In the first place, it is one, I am inclined to believe' totally unexpected. In the second place, it is startling, because it confounds and perplexes as to its design. In the third place, it startles one to be compelled to calculate whether or not Burnside can be overwhelmed by the rebels. This is the only purpose which it is generally conceived the rebels can have in moving northward to attack and overwhelm Burnside before he can form a junction with Rosecrans. The two armies have been moving for some time past on parallel lines upon Chattanooga and Knoxville, without at- tempting or proposing, to form a junction imme- diately, and in doing so they have got into the situation described. One thinks naturally of Blucher and Wellington, a,nd this startles. The broken front would certainly be tempting to a general with an army superior, or even equal, to either half of that of his enemy. It would be dangerous to us if we were in the face of an enemy equal to either Bosecrans or Burnside. But Johnston is inferior, to the former, and I believe not more than equal to the latter. If inferior to Burnside, Johnston's demonstration will result in nothing. If equal, he will prove a dangerous enemy to Burnside, and will at least halt him. If superior, he will force him to retreat. Burnside's retreat would halt Rosecrans. The rmaioured movement, therefore, promises some- thing."

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