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The Siege of Charleston.

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The Siege of Charleston. The. correspondent of the New York Herald, TTitingfrcm Morris Island on the 3rcl inst., thus describes the third bombardment of Fort Sumter, which took place on the 1st of this month:- On -Tuesday last, at the request of Admiral Daklgren, General Grilmore ordered our breaching batteries to open for the third time on Fort Sumter, to dismount five guns which were alleged to have been placed in position by the rebels after we had once effectually reduced the work. The fire was maintained from daylight to dark, with delibe- ration and great effect. On no previous occasion had our fire been so accurate, and on no one day's bombardment had the results been so apparent. The guns were directed against the parapet and the traverses of sandbags protecting the rebel guns OIl the north-east angle of the fort. The east face also came in for its share of the pounding. During the forenoon three guns were dismounted, one of which was toppled over into the sea by our heaviest projectiles, and another was placed hors de combat during the afternoon. The sandbag traverses were tumbled down, and the parapet of the east face levelled to the rampart. The rampart of the 21 ortk-east side of the work was repeatedly struck and torn to pieces, and when the fire ceased at night nearly all the arches 011 the east face were visible, and the south-east bastion was so completely in ruins that it was impossible to say where either of the faces joining them began. The fort is now in rums, and cannot cover a gun. Any further con- tinuance of our fire would be a waste of valuable supplies, which can be used to a better advantage hereafter. During the afternoon of Tuesday the commanders of the Monitors were assembled in Admiral Dahlgren's cabin, on the flagship Phila- delphia, and a night attack on Fort Sumter was determined on. The Monitors were prepared for action, and at about eleven o'clock at night they steamed up the harbour and began to fight. The night was quite favourable for the movement, the moon being partially obscured by light, fleecy clouds, and the sea smooth. The rebel works on Sullivan's Island and Fort Sumter were as plainly defined as could be desired, while at the same time the -Monitors were quite as easily made out by the rebel gunners. From half-past eleven until four o'clock in the morning the Monitors and Iron- sides, which did not go in the fight until after midnight, were firing upon the north end face of Sumter, sending their huge 15-inch shells and 200-pounder Parrott projectiles crashing through the wall of the fort with terrible effect, at a distance of about eight hundred yards. Meanwhile they endured an intense and heavy fire from Fort Moultrie, Battery Bee, the battery on Mount Pleasant, on Sullivan's Island, and Fort Wagner and Battery Gregg, on Morris Island. I watched the firing for several hours during the night, and must say that I have never seen the rebel guns worked with so much vigour and rapidity as they were on Sullivan's Island on that night. One continuous line of flashes from the Beach Inlet Battery to the work on the extreme left, and an uninterrupted roar of heavy guns and howl of rifle bolts, made the scene one not easily to be forgotten. The smoke from the rebel batteries and the Monitors hung heavily upon the water and obscured the largest objects from view, and only by the quick flashes that gleamed through the smoke of battle could we locate the exact position of the contending forces. The Monitors were repeatedly hit, but no one was hurt on any of them except aboard the MontauK. During the action the turret was struck by a rifle projectile, which started the plates, and drove out a bolt which unfortunately hit Lieutenant Commander Oscar C. Badger on his right ankle and broke the bone of his leg. The same bolt or a fragment of it struck one of the men on the thigh and inflicted a painful but not seriors wound. Lieut. Commander Badger was doing very well, and is still upon the Mon- ta,uk, from whence he will be removed to the Wabash as soon as it is safe to do so. No other casualties occurred."

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