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THE COURT. --

POLITICAL GOSSIP. ---ø.--

THE ARTS, LITERATURE, &c.…

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. --+-

How Damp Grain may be Harvested.

Flower Garden and Shrubberies.

Hardy Fruit and Kitchen Garden.

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Hardy Fruit and Kitchen Garden. Pay every attention to getting the wood of peaches and apricots well ripened, by exposure, shortening, &c. Most kinds of apples may be gathered during this and next month. Late pears should be left on the trees while the weather continues favourable for their ripening. Prepare for planting all kinds of fruit trees, by getting the ground in good order for the different kinds. On cold stiff soils, it is advisable to plant on hillocks, one foot or eighteen inches higher than the surrounding surface. The trees will not grow so fast in consequence, and will require more attention in summer in the way of mulching, but they will form short-jointed, well-ripened, fruitful wood, which is the best preventive of canker, gum, &c., and will save the labour of resorting much to root-pruning. No oppor- tunity should now be lost for getting potatoes that are ripe out of the ground, and stored in a dry condition. Potatoes may either be kept in narrow pits, with a little dry earth sprinkled among them, or in airy dark sheds. Before storing, however, take care to separate the bad ones, fortunately, very scarce this season, from those that are sound. Use cauliflower before it gets too large, and prepare a shed or pit to plant a quantity on the first approach of frost. French beans may require a slight protection at night. Plant out lettuces and endive for spring use. If planted on the sloping sides of wide ridges they will stand better, damp being quite as destructive as frost.—Gardeners' Chronicle.

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