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The Drafc.

Presentation of a Sword to…

Mr. Vallandigham in Ohio.

Bombardment of Charleston.

A Panic in Richmond.

The Armies of the Rappahannock.

Fight in Green-brier County:

The Army of Rosecrans.

Army of the Tennessee.

ATTEMPTED MURDER AND SUICIDE.

THE DUKE OF NEWCASTLE ON THE…

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THE DUKE OF NEWCASTLE ON THE VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT. The Duke of Newcastle, K.G., Secretary of State for the Colonies and Lord-Lieutenant of the county of Nottingham, reviewed the 2nd Administrative Bat- talion of Notts Volunteers last week, which had been encamped on the Plains-piece, near Worksop, for five days. There was a numerous attendance, including the Earl and Countess of Lincoln, Sir Thomas W. White, the Ladies Clinton, Lady Henrietta D'Eyn- court, Lady F. Simpson, and the chief families of the district. At the close of the review the Lord-Lieu- tenant addressed the battalion. After remarking generally upon the movements of the battalion, the noble duke observed that he hoped not only the mem- bers of the battalion, but the spectators by whom he was surrounded and those with whom they were asso- ciated, would not falter in- their endeavours to keep up this most admirable and thoroughly independent volunteer force. They all knew how the movement originated, and he was sure they felt with him that an institution like the volunteer force, as it was not originated in a panic, ought not to be continued in a panic. While it was originated for the due security of the country, they were ready to acknowledge that it ought to be maintained for the benefit and protection of the nation at large, and, he hoped, for their (the volunteers') amusement and in- struction also. He was supported on the right and on the left by those who were most anxious for the pros- parity of the volunteer force, and he would appeal to them to lend a larger measure of assistance to the volunteers. It was true that, as compared with their position on the first formation of the corps, the volun- teers were now in a better position pecuniarily, as Government rendered certain aid to battalions; but the volunteers had certain continuous expenses to meet—expenses which increasedrather than diminished. It was most desirable that those who, from a variety of circumstances, could not join the force, should show their appreciation of it by subscribing or enlarging their contributions to its funds. Government contri- buted much more largely and liberally than formerly; but, notwithstanding this, volunteers had now uniforms to provide and expenses to meet which could only be met byincreasedaidfromthefriends ofthemovement. There- fore, without sending the begging-cap round the field, he hoped the ladies present would use their influence for their husbands to contribute to its funds. In some instances he was afraid that the annual contributions were rather less than they ought to be from certain, sources. The volunteers generally throughout tl e kingdom had shown a disposition for military duty far beyond what could possibly have been expected, and he was of opinion that at the present time they were just of as much value to the country, and as greatly required, as when five years ago they were organised. He had before remarked that the volunteer force was not organised in a panic; he did not believe that it was established from any such cause. The object was to provide a force the efficiency of which would be such that, should occasion require, the standing army might be safely employed elsewhere while the defence of the country could be adequately provided for. Some wise people had said that they did not see much, if any good at all, in the volunteer move- ment that they ne: e-- thought we should be invaded; and that such was their opinion when the movement commenced. These people, who were technically and vulgarly speaking "funkers," were very quiet when the movement began., but exceedingly bold when satisfied that danger was not to be apprehended (laughter). He (the Lord-Lieutenant) was of ppinion that the volunteer force had proved of incalculable benefit. When it was organised he did not expect there would be an invasion, but, considering the great possessions of this 'country and the vast interests at stake both for this and future generations, he regarded 'L 'v it as imperative that the force should be established. The 150,000 volunteers now enrolled were a sufficient security from invasion, and at the same time, should occasion require, they would supply the place of a large military force and of the regular army. He trusted that both the volunteers themselves and the friends of the cause would be impressed with the im- portance of maintaining the force in its efficiency, and that they would not allow any feeling of dissatisfaction to alter their opinion of it. They were, no doubt, quite as well aware as himself of the importance of battalion drills; it was by such drills that a permanent position, so essential to a military force, must be obtained.

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EXECUTION OF FOUR MEN AT KIRK…

THE CHANNEL FLEET AT BELFAST.

LINCOLNSHIRE SHEEP.'.'

C-HARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER AGAINST1…

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