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POISONOUS PROPERTIES OF THE…

STRICT NEUTRALITY.

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Advantage of a "Postman's Knook. At the Judges' Chambers, on Wednesday, an application was made to discharge a person named Onions out of custody, on the ground that the arrest had been effected by the sheriffs' officers breaking open the outer door. The officers swore that they got into the house at night, after watching for some time by the dodge of a postman's knock." The door was opened, and after a struggle the capture was made. Mr. Justice Mellor refused to order the discharge, believing that the arrest was made through tile" postman's knock." Singular Case of Smuggling.—On Thursday morning last a large package was delivered at the house of the Rev. Mr. Baldey, at Southsea, having been conveyed there by a railway van. Mr. Baldey had not been advised that it had been consigned to him; but, as there was no mistake about the direction, he opened it, and was astonished to find that it con- tained about 5 cwt. of tobacco. Suspecting that it had been smuggled, he gave information to the Ports- mouth police, and a constable went to his house and afterwards communicated with the officers of the coast guard, who took possession of the tobacco. From subsequent information they received the officers pro- ceeded to a house at Fratton, in the parish of Portsea, and there found a similar case also containing 5 cwt. of smuggled tobacco; It appears that after the case had been sent from the railway station to Mr. Baldey's house, some persons called at the station and inquired for a case of "books" directed to the rev. gentleman, alleging that they had his written authority to take it away; and when they found that it had already been delivered they were of course greatly chagrined. It is clear that the case had been directed to Mr. Baldey to avoid suspicion, the parties having a confident hope that their arrangements would enable them to obtain possession of it before it was discovered. Antiquity of the Bugge Family—From an heraldic visitation of the northern counties of Eng- land in 1530, it appears that Ralph Bugge, of Notting- ham, flourished in the days of Henry III., and pur- chased lands at Willoughby. in Nottinghamshire, in 1241. But, alas even in the great thirteenth cen- tury, men were h. i\-ee from human weaknesses. The sons of Ralph Eugse possessed lands respectively at Bingham auct at Willonghbyy so their sons ungrate- fully cast away t'Mh- grandfather's Bugge, and figure in the pedigree as Sir Richard de Bingham and Sir Richard do Wiiioughby. The gentleman who a few months ago followed their example and took the name of Norfolk Howard perhaps hardly knew how ancient and honourable a surname ho was forsaking.

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