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POISONOUS PROPERTIES OF THE…

STRICT NEUTRALITY.

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STRICT NEUTRALITY. (From the New York Times.) England, following out her policy in the East is about to have a turn at Japan. Whether Japan deserves a flogging or not, whether she has violated treaties and assassinated British residents, is a matter concerning which opinions differ. We can view the contest from afar, and, without aspiring to the spirit of prophecy, can easily foretell which will come out of the contest winner. Japan is a wealthy nation, and Eng- land always makes a war pay—or, in 'other words, after whipping a people, sends in the bill and has it cashed. Now, as England has, in our contest exhibited so perfect a spirit and practice of neutrality, it would be the worst of ingratitude if we did not return it in kind. The Siagoon will be looking round about these days for fast-sailing steamers, possibly for a few Monitors, and where can he look but to his friend and ally, Brother Jonathan ? To be sure, we cannot countenance such an application for an instant, and it will be the duty of Mr. Seward and Mr. Welles to immediately inform his Majesty of that fact; but if, in the meantime, the" Em-peror of China" or the "King of the Cannibals" should apply to our Webbs and M'Kays for such merchandise, it would be impossible to refuse, for both these sovereigns are on terms of strict friendship with Great Britain, and have a right to as many fast-sailing steamers as they can pay for. If, when they leave our shores, they should miss their way, and get into some Japanese port, or make a few rich hauls upon British com- merce, will the fault be ours ? We shall be enabled to show from British precedent that the transaction was one of strict neutrality, and that by interfering we should have violated the rights of citizens, and inter- fered with the doings of a nation with whom we were upon fraternal terms. Should a protest be entered, we can seize some cockboat and put our law courts at work upon her while the big craft get out of reach, or we can get up a diplomatic correspondence so deep that the bottom cannot be sounded, which will answer all purposes until a score of millions of pounds of English maritime property is consigned to the blazes. Further, if our enterprising merchants see fit to make some port upon our western coast—say Portland or San Francisco, a Nassau or a Bermuda—can we help it ? If the thousand ingenious inventors of instru- ments of destruction, now looking out for encourage- ment, were to offer themselves and their machines to the Siagoon, and should some fine day blow up the British fleet sent to destroy his cities, would the fault be ours ? Can we be expected to examine every ma- chine and every ship that clears from this port for China, especially when it is paid for ? No reasonable Government would expect it. We have learned our lessons on international law from England, and what- ever she teaches us must be right, although we shall certainly never commit ourselves as a nation in up- holding it. In the meantime, should the Emperor of China," or her Majesty of. Figii want anything in our line, we can assure them that if they should happen to have only Japanese oblongs on hand to pay with., they will not be refused—perhaps not. 4.

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