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ACCIDENT ON THE BLACKWALL…

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ACCIDENT ON THE BLACKWALL Pi, AIL IVA Y. On Saturday morning, about eleven, an alarming accident happened to a North London train on the Blackwall Railway, close to the Fenchurch-street station, which nearly resulted in the engine, if not some of the carriages, being precipitated over the viaduct into the street below. The train was the ordinary one from Camden-town, and was due in Fenchurch-street at eleven o'clock. Fortunately there were not many passengers in it, and, more providentially still, there were only three or four, it is stated, in the carriage next to the tender. The train was coming at its usual reduced speed into the station on the south side of the line, and on .approaching within a few yards of the extreme end of the platform the engine, from some cause not satisfactorily ascer- tained, suddenly left the metals and slewed round right across the line, the buffers and front part of the engine forcing down the parapet, and a large portion of the wall of the viaduct overlooking Cooper's-row, Tower-hill. Two or three feet more, and the engine must have been precipitated over into the street below. Happily the brickwork seemed to have checked its progress, and so have averted some sad catastrophe. As may be imagined, the shock was t severe. The hrst carriage rose upon the buffers of the engine, and was thrown on one side, and the next carriage was off the rails. The passengers were necessarily much alarmed, but not one was hurt, at least there have been no complaints. As soon as possible the passengers wereliberated from the train and walked up the line to the station. On the driver finding the engine leavingthemetals he shut off the steam, and so lessened the shock. Mr. Wightman, the company's superintendent, and other officials, were soon in attendance, and vigorous efforts were at once made to remove the engine, which entirely blocked up the North London and Blackwall traffic side of the station. The trains, however, were dispatched from the other side of the railway station; -ind vast crowds were assembled in Cooper's-row, to view the engine, which nearly overhung the parapet, and the destruction sustained. It is stated that the part of the line where the engine went off has recently been under repair, and it is just possible that the rails might in some way have been out of gauge. The occurrence created considerable commotion amongst the many travel- lers who daily throng the Fenchurch-street station.

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