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JMli. UHAULUS HUMlMStt UlV…

[No title]

POLITICAL UOSSJLE. *

DAHOMEY AN ATROCITIES.

THE ARTS, LITERATURE, &c.…

A YOUNG HIGHWAYMAN.

FANATICO PER LA MUSICO.

A CORK TOWN COUNCILLOR AND…

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A CORK TOWN COUNCILLOR AND LORD DUNDREARY. Mr. Bernard Sheehan is an original and a unique specimen of a town councillor and a poor-law guardian. He is a rara avis in terris, for we believe there is not in the kingdom, or indeed in the world, anybody whose character and cast of mind bear the slightest resemblance to his. Were it not for his unintentional jokes and his laughable blunders, many of our local meetings would be of the dullest and most uninteresting kind. But, although he has figured week after week for a great number of years past in the columns of all the newspapers in this city, and has been laughed at even in the remotest parts of the country, he never caused more amusement than he did on Wednesday at the meeting of the board of guardians, by his simplicity and his credulity. Amongst the gentleman present was one from England, who attended the meeting, we presume, with the intention of seeing how business was done in Cork, and, we have been told, of hearing the celebrated Barney Shehan. The curiousity of the latter gentleman was aroused by the ap- pearance of the stranger, and he inquired his name. Few people who know Mr. Sheehan think of answering him except with a jest, and so he was told that the gentleman who had attracted his attention was Lord Dundreary. Mr. Sheehan has not much knowledge of the peerage list, nor an extensive acquaintance with the nobility and not being much of a reading man, it is not surprising that he bad never heard the name of Lord Dundreary before. After a short time be rose with great solemnity, and having expressed his sense of the honour conferred upon the board by the visit of a nobleman of such an exalted station as that of Lord Dundreary, he thought he might as well turn his lordship's visit to some practical account. Perhaps, my lord, you would be so obliging as to tell us what the people's dresses cost in your union, if you plaze ? The scene that followed may be imagined. All business was suspended for some minutes, and every one abandoned himself to a paroxysm of laughter, in which the straBge gentleman, who was supposed to be Lord Dundreary, heartily joined. There was not a grave countenance in the room except Mr. Sheehan's; and he, seeing, from the manner in which his compliment to the supposed nobleman was received, that he was mistaken, seized the gentleman who had misinformed him by the ear, and cried, This purty boy tould me he was Lord Dundreary. Well, now you see what a lot o' lies there is in the world; I declare you can't depend on half what you are told. 01 ye are a fine lot o' lads." This speech, part of which was uttered in the style of a man sorrow- fully moralising upon the depravity cf human pature, and another part in a manner which showed that Mr. Sheehan himself enjoyed the joke, was succeeded by another burst of laughter; and the guardians did not cease to smile till the board adjourned.-Cork Reporter.

THE O'DONOGHUE ON THE HYDE-PARK…

MUNIFICENT BEQUESTS.

.IMPRISONMENT OF THREE GENTLEMEN…

[No title]

,THE COURT.