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DEATH FROM LUCIFER MATCHES.

Superphosphates as Manure.

Flower Garden and Shrubberies.

THE ARTS, LITERATURE, &C.…

A VOICE FROM LANCASHIRE.

[No title]

A SAD CASE. I

THE COURT."

POLTTICAT, GOSSIP. --+-,

THE RUSSIAN ARMY.

THE PRINCESS MARIA PIA.

THE LAST ARCTIC EXPEDITION.

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THE LAST ARCTIC EXPEDITION. The Newfoundland papers furnish some information respecting Mr. Hall's Arctic expedition supplied by him on his arrival at St. John's, being unable to further pro- secute his mission in consequence of the loss of some of his craft. It appears that he has secured a large quantity of relics of Frobisher's expedition gathered at various parts of his debarcation. Among them are pieces of coal, brick, and wood, and a portion of an iron cannon- ball, probably used as ballast. The coal has bean over- grown with moss and a dark vegetable growth the brick looks quite as bright as when it was turned out of "one talle ship of her Majesties, named the Aude, of nine scora tunnes or thereabouts "-the vessel in which Frobisher departed on his second voyage, after having kissed her Majestie's hand, and been dismissed with gracious countenance and comfort- able words." The pieces of wood are merely oak chips which have been well preserved, having been embedded in coal dust for nearly 300 years. The piece of iron ballast is much decomposed and rusted. Mr. Hall found upon one of the islands a trench 20 feet deep and 100 feet long, leading to the water, in which a party of Frobisher's men who had been captured by the Esquimaux, with the assistance of their captors had built a small vessel, intending therein to set sail for England. After putting to sea they experienced such severe weather that they were obliged to return, all of them being frost-bitten. They lived many years among the Esquimaux, who treated them very kindly, and all of them eventually died there. These facts are related by the Esquimaux as a matter of tradition. Mr. Hall learned that a few years since a party of Innuits had seen two Codluna (white men's) boats, and found on one of the Lower Savage Islands (which commence near the mainland on the north side of Hudson's Straits) what they termed "soft stones." One of the Innuits, who had become possessed of a gun and ammunition from the Hudson's Bay Company, recognised them as bullets. Sir John Franklin, rot knowing how long he might be detained in the Arctic seas, carried out a large quantity of ammunition, and Mr. Hall has not a particle of doubt that the crews of these two boats, in their endeavour to get down through Hudson's Straits and on to Labrador, had thrown out these bullets so that their progress might not be impeded. Mr. Hall has with him an Esquimaux family, consisting of father, mother, and son; the father and mother were taken to England some years ago, and presented to her Majesty. He has many interesting memorials of the social lif" of the Innuits, little articles very neatly cut from bone or ivory, representing the polar bears, seals, walrus, and ducks, &c. These show a great deal of patient perseverance with the rude tools with which they must have been worked. Mr. Hall says life in these high latitudes is not so difficult of preservation as is generally supposed—the snow and ice houses of the Innuits being exceedingly tight and comfortable, and their coarse animal food rendered palatable by the sharp- ness of appetite engendered by the been atmosphere of all extreme northern climate.—Montreal Gazette, Sept. 12.

THE ITALIAN CRISIS AND THE…

Ir T.T P

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