Hide Articles List

15 articles on this Page

UNPRECEDENTED DESTRUCTION…

SYSTEMATIC PLUNDER OF EMPLOYERS.

GARIBALDIAN RIOTS IN HYDE…

[No title]

ATTEMPTED SUICIDE AT THE EXHIBITION.

DEATH BY THE UPSETTING A CART.

[No title]

MURDER AND ATTEMPTED SUICIDE…

FEASIBLE SOLUTION OF THE ROMAN…

PRESIDENT LINCOLN AND THE…

NARCOTISING CHILDREN.

[No title]

WHOLESALE ROBBERY OF JEWELLERY…

pATAL COLLISION ON THE RIVER.

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

— —:—: Rice in Spain.—The profits of the rice crop are inducing its cultivation in the extensive swamps near the mouth of the Ebro in Spain, a proceeding which,, raises considerable opposition in other quarters on account of the fevers which it is alleged to generate. This culti- vation, however, does not generate those fevers, for they formerly existed in those marshy grounds; on the con- trary, if properly conducted, it establishes a kind of draining. It has been known near Valencia to reduce the intensity and prevalence of the disease; but there is no denying that the first pioneers in those wastes must be great sufferers.-The Grocer. An Australian paper, in speaking of the over- stock of horses in their market, says:—Talk of the. nobility ot the horse! why we learn from reliable au- thority that Mr. Atkinson, of Sophienburg, has taken a contract to boil down 2,000 horses. There is no sale for those animals, and the owner wants to sell their oil, hides, and hoofs, and thus get as much from them as possible. The fate of Dibdin's high-mettled racer wasi illustrious compared with the ignoble doom which awaits the horse-stock of the interior. The wild charger of Australia's burning plains may well envy the European donkey his thistle. The Popular Emperor.—"But the Emperor is so popular!' Those who are initiated into the secrets of the popularity-manufacture laugh to hear this said. As soon as the Emperor's visit to a given locality is rumoured (and it is generally announced four, five, or six months beforehand), no public improvement, no act of public justice or benevolence, that can possibly be put off, is to be extracted from the local authorities. If there is a street to be opened, a harbour to be improved, a public promenade to be formed, an old soldier to be decorated," a widow to be pensioned, everything is saved up for the Emperor's visit, that he may appear as the earthly giver of all good. Do you wonder at his being popular ? Is not the cat's-meat man popular among the cats ? But the genuine cat's-meat man trusts entirely to his well-filled basket for his popularity. Not so the third Napoleon. Whenever the Emperor is aboutto pass by a given line of railway, the officials of the company are sure to see ar- rive, with free passes in their hands (which the Govern- ment have power to give without stint) some seven or eight hundred individuals in all manner of costumes, from knights of the Legion of Honour, who take place in coupes, to mere navvies travelling third-class. They have, apparently, no connection with the Imperial suite, or with the staff of police, in or out of uniform, who necessarily go down on the occasion, but they travel down a day or two before his Majesty's departure; they travel up again about the period of his return. Do not suppose that they are gendarmes; mouchards they may be when requisite; but their main office is a much more cheerful one; they are popularity makers. It is they who fan the sometimes very dull embers of provincial enthusiasm into flame. Whenever the local supply is deficient, from among their number can always be drawn the old soldier, the bluff peasant, the intelligent artisan, the hard-working labourer, whose sayings and doings in relation to the Emperor form as it were the f euilleton of each Imperial progress.—Spectator.