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THE WAR IN AMERICA. 4.

MINING COMPANY REVELATIONS.

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THE AMERICAN NEGROES AND MR.…

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ENCOUNTER WITH POACHERS.

ANOTHER ALLEGED WIFE MURDER.

MEETING AT STALYBRlDGE ON…

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MEETING AT STALYBRlDGE ON IN- TERVENTION IN AMERICA. A public meeting, called by requisition to the Mayor, was held on Tuesday in the Assembly Room of the Town-hall, Stalybridge, for the purpose of considering the question of intervention in America. The requisitiou was as follows:- "We, the undersigned inhabitants of Stalvbridge and neighbourhood, deeply deploring the unnatural war now ragmg in the states of North America.the misery and destitution thereby inflicted upon the civilised world, and particularly upon the inhabitants of this district, and feeling convinced that the continuance of this un- happy strife will be alike ruinous to the hostile parties and to the vast population of this district depending upon the cotton trade, and that the Confederate states of North America have maintained their independence a sufficient length of time to warrant her Majesty recog- nising the existing government thereof—respectfully request you to call a public meeting of the inhabitants of Stalybridge, to consider the necessity of petitioning her magistrate the Queen to take immediate measures for the recognition of the Confederate states of North America." An hour before the time appointed for the meeting to begin, there were in the roadway outside the hall many hundreds more than the hall could possibly hold. When the doors were opened the hall was quickly filled with working men, and tolerable quietness prevailed until the meeting commenced. The Mayor, Mr. Robert Hopwood, presided, and with him was the town-clerk. Mr. John Bamford moved the first resolution, which was:—"That, in the opinion of this meeting, the lament- able distress and pauperism ?o prevalent in the cotton districts of Cheshire and Lancashire are consequent upon the deplorable conflict now raging in North America, and that our Government would be justified in taking any steps in accordance with the principles of international law to arrest, if possible, the indigence and pauperism now closing upon us." He proceeded to deal with the question of distress and the war in a short speech, and was followed by Mr. John Bradbury, who se- conded the motion. Both speakers were listened to with attention. Mr. J. Billcliffe, in an excellent speech, discussed the question outlined in the requisition, and throughout was loudly cheered. He said he was opposed to intervention, and carried nearly the whole meeting with him. Mr. T. Hodson moved as an amendment, "That, in the opinion of this meeting, the distress prevailing in the manufactaring districts is mainly owing to the rebellion of the Southern States against the American constitu- tion." ° This was seconded by Mr. S. Niel, and, after being put, was declared carried by an immense majority— something like a hundred to one-amid loud cheers. A vote of thanks to the chairman concluded the proceedings. — +-

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EXTRACTS FROM " PUKCH" & "…

EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE OF A…

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