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TOPICS OF THE DAY. -

GARIBALDI MEETING IN HYDE-PARK.…

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I MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF A GENTLE-…

THE BISHOP OF OXFORD AS A…

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THE BISHOP OF OXFORD AS A SUSSEX SQUIRE. On Tuesday last the annual harvest home for the parishes of Laviagton and Griffham, Sussex, in which the Bishop of Oxford is the principal land- owner, was celebrated with great rejoicing. The day was ushered in by morning prayers in Griffham Church, and, as there was no sermon, the lawn and rectory grounds, by half-past' twelve, were crowded with the parishioners of all grades, and a large gathering of the clergy and laity of the county, and of visitors from a distance staying at the different houses in the Neighbourhood. Dinner for rich and poor was served in a tent ■en the lawn, and full justice was done to the viands. Very judiciously long speech-making was excluded, and the Rector, the Rev.. W. Randall, in a very happy speech lumped together every conceivable toast from the Queen 1:0 the cook who made the puddings. The Bishop of Oxford, of course, had to ceply for the wh@le, and it is seedless to say, proved him- -self equal to the occasion. He firs& personated the rector himself, who had concluded his speech by 'expressing a hope, as no one could propose his health, that they would drink it with all the ethers, (by remarking on the extreme affection the proposer of the toast bad for the rector. In replying for The '.Queen, his lordship said that the first wish of her Majesty's heart in her own deep sorrow was for the happiness of all her subjects. In reference to the Prince of Wales he confessed that he felt a difficulty, as he must imagine .also that beautiful princess of whom they had heard so much but they would all join him in wishing <every happiness to his Royal Highness, and in the expression of a hope that his marriage might be ;blessed as bad been his mother's. ;la responding for the bishop of the iiocese and himself, and for his -son, Mr. Reginald Wilborforce, the future owner of the property, the task was easier, but in replying for all the-visitors—Churchmen, 'Church- women, -Church children, and Church sucklings, he confessed that he broke down utterly. Why the weight,ef responding for the London clergy, repre- sented by his friend Air. Lawrell, was in itself suffi- cient'to break the back of a country bishop, to say nothing-of the other visitors of .all classes .present. Having made a few observations on the benefit of har-vest-ikomes, and. called for three cheers for the rector, the rector's lady, and the cook who made the puddings, he advised them to go out and enjoy the games, -and not mind,a little rain, which never hurt "us Sussex folk, who are not made of salt or sugar." In the games which followed the bishop was the life and soul of the proceedings, and it was most interesting to observe how he entered into .&1I the fun, throwing sacks before blindfolded boys to throw them down, scoring himself at the women's cricket, looking on at the merry dance, and having a. word for each poor person and child on the ground. He was well desci-ibedas "our own bishop, living among bis own people," and the only regret was that, kis many duties enabled him to spend so little time on his Sussex property. A harvest home could not have been held under happier auspices, the beautifully-wooded bills forming a pleasing background to the scene of rich and poor in variegated costumes and every conoeivable toilet, from the London belle's extensive get-up to the simple ad@rnments -o £ the humblest rustics, enjoying them- selves innocently on thegreeu sward. Evening- prayer in the parish church, which was densely crowded, closed a happy day. The bishop, who wore a sim- ple smrplice, pronounced the absolution and read the second lesson, after which the rector made a short but very appropriate address xm the religious use to be made of the festival. It is right to say that the success of the day was mainly owing, not only o the incessant exertions of the rector and his wife and the curate (the Rev. J. Wilkinson), but to the assistance rendered by Mr. T. Maberly, the son of the vicar of Cuckfield, whose harvest home (which took place last Thursday) is quite a model one.

MR. PARTRIDGE'S REPORT TO…

ATTEMPTED ESCAPE FROJf GAOL.

POLITICAL GOSSIP. -

VICTOR HUGO ON THE PRESS.

THE NEW ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY.

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