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CLOTHING FOR THE DISTRESSED…

PAINFUL CONCEALMENT OF BIRTH.

GARIBALDI AT SPEZZIA.

LIBERATION OF REV. SELLA MARTIN'S…

ADVERTISING FOR A WIPE.

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ADVERTISING FOR A WIPE. At the Clerkenwell Police-court on Saturday, Edward Hunt, aged 72, a carpenter, residing at 5, Merlin's-place, Hosoman-street, Clerkenwell, was charged with threatening to shoot Mrs. Mark Fleet- wood, of 87, Frederick-street Caledonian-road. Mr. John Wakeling, solicitor, appeared for the complainant, and from his statement it appeared that his client is a married woman, but has not seen or heard of her husband for the last twenty years. About last November the defendant advertised in a local newspaper for a respectable woman, middle- aged, with about £40, for a wife. The complainant answered that advertisement, stating that she was a widow, that she had no money, but had a good house of furniture, and directed that all communica- tion should be by letter only. The defendant, instead of writing, went himself, and he was so smitten with her charms and she with his that she consented to take a coffee-shop, with him as a partner, at 108, City-road. When they had been in the shop some time the defendant was taken to prison for not paying for his wife's funeral, and whilst he was there the com- plainant removed the goods, and went away. She was away from him for some time, but on Thursday morning last he found her out, rushed into her room, kissed her, and embracing her said, Well, now, you shall marry me." The complainant replied, "I never can, I never will," on which the defendant said, Well, you shall have me, I have made up my mind you shall live with me, or by —— you shall die with me. I have brought a double-barrelled pistol, and have given 3s. 6d. for it—(a laugh)—and I will murder you/' He afterwards said it would be a pity to see the complainant's blood spilt over the nice furniture—(a laugh)-and that his life was nothing without he could live with the complainant. It was for these threats that he (Mr. Wakeling) had to ask that the defendant should be bound over to keep the peace towards the complainant, and all her Majesty'? subjects. The defendant, looking tenderly at the complainant, a woman about 50 years of age, said, I will never hurt you. All I have done is for love; and I love you still" (loud laughter). Mr. D'Eyncourt said he should bind the defendant over in his own recognisance in the sum of Y,50 to keep the peace for six months but if he was brought up again on a similar charge he would have to find two responsible sureties in the sum of £100 to keep the peace for twelve months, and in default would be locked up.

THE GLASGOW MURDER.

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