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VARIETIES-GRAVE AND GAY.

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- ASSAULT ON A SIGNALMAN.

A VICTIM OF WILD PHANTASY.

HUMOURS OF THE SCOTCH BENCH.

THE COMIC PAPERS.

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AMERICAN MEAT IN LONDON.

A PREACHER AND THE VACCINATION…

ADVENTURE WITH A " SEA MONSTER."I

THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ACT.

MR. BRIGHT'S BIRMINGHAM SPEECH.

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MR. WADE'S HONOURS.

THE MALAY DISTURBANCES.

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PICKETING IN THE BOOT TRADE.

WHAT THE "WORLD" SAYS,

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WHAT THE "WORLD" SAYS, (Notes by Atlas.") When Lord Eustace Cecil was made Surveyor-General ef Ordnance the appointment surprised no one, for he is a brother of the Marquis of Salisbury. When his lordship gave evidence of unfitness to fulfil the duties of the head of an important public department still less surprise was felt, for he was notoriously the least clever member of a clever family. But when he not only shewed himself incompetent, but made himself offensive to all his subordinates by an habi- tual tone of supercilious insolence, it certainly was thought that Mr. Disraeli had gone a little too far in his wish to provide for the younger brother of a colleague at the expense of the country. The latest exploit of Lord Eustace has been to drive Colonel Reilly into resigning his position in the Civil Service, by writing to him a letter couched in lan- fuage such as no gentleman could submit to. Mr. lardy and the Duke of Cambridge, who are the offi- dal superiors both of Lord Eustace and Colonel i have insisted upon the former either sending in his resignation or making an abject apology to the Colonel. As they have not done so, the letter will become the subject of a Parliamentary de- bate at the commencement of the session. The country can more easily spare the services of Lord Eustace Cecil than of Colonel Reilly, I believe that Mr. Hunt, if he does not see his own way to retire into private life, will be called upon to resign his place as Surveyor of the Public Works De- partment, or to accept his salary without the com- missions which are so great a scandal to a public de- partment. His business is to report upon the pur- chases necessary for the erection of new public build- ings. For this his salary is £700 per annum. That his firm should receive a commission of 1 per cent. Upon the amount paid for these purchases is obviously a gross abuse. During the present year Parliament will be asked to vote nearly £2,000,000 in order to acquire sites in Whitehall and elsewhere. I do not grudge the money, because its expenditure is a matter of necessity, but I do grudge the commission which will be paid to Mr. Hunt for Work which will occupy him at most one week. It will somewhat exceed the annual salary of the Lord Chancellor, and will be about three times that of the Prime Minister. Our principal art-collectors are, I hear, very chary of parting with the treasures of their galleries for the Philadelphia Exhibition. Two or three smaller Landseer* and Mr. Frith's Railway Station" are the only modern works of any celebrity which have been promised. There is not the smallest foundation for the state- ment, copied by the Times from the Unrk, to the effect that Her Majesty's Theatre has been acquired by the Government and is to be converted into a post-office. Sir Anthony Rothschild has excited the contempt of the money-mongering fraternity, and the admiration of those who do not worship the Golden Calf, by dying a comparative pauper. He leaves to his widow a pittance of JE 15,000 per annum and his house in London to each of his daughters £200,000, which is to revert to the firm" in case of their dying childless ti his son-in-law jE50,000 to his brother his racehorses to three of his nephews his house at Newmarket, and to the nephew who inherits his baronetcy his landed estates. I am glad to be in a position to state that the Queen has definitively decided upon opening the coming ses- sion of Parliament in person. The arrangements for the progress of her Majesty from Buckingham Palace to the House of Lords will be in every detail the same as usual; and although a strong effort was made by the military to play the leading part in the business, that role will, as before, be performed by the police. perhaps few people have any idea of the number of those civil guardians of the peace who will be on duty on the 8th of February, in order to insure, as far as may be, absolute protection to her Majesty's person. Between Buckingham Palace and the House of Lords there will be not fewer than from 3,000 to 4,000 polico- x?? ?f the °Pening of Parliaments force, • II sVfficlcnt to guard efficients every -n world. I understand that considerable Uq?,, e5S14.i.n Prevails in the highest circles as to the .v r^?Ption which will be given to the ttf the public. It sounds incredible, but it is none the less a fact, that efforts have been made by e a tnorities, m accordance with instructions from a Bighquarter, to ascertain, by personal contact with the people their opinion on the subject of the reappear- fceclusion Queen after so long and unparalleled a lIeel usion. *rhe clever Italian correspondent of the Paris M. Erdan, tells us that Lord Ripon presented e Pope with £ 20,000, and that Cardinal Antonelli mveets a" moneys received by his Holiness in English securities. The Pope is believed to derive aregular in- ÐOme of :£120,000 from this source alone. Would not a slave circular something like this be generally approved ?—" The Admiralty wish naval officers to remember that the deck of one of H.M.'s men-of-war is to be considered as British ground. By the law of England, any slave touching British ground is de facto a free man in the event th ve reaching one of H.M.'s ships, it will be duty of the officer in command to refuse, under any pretence whatever, to give him up to his late owners, whether the ship, at the time of his reaching KL t N1 sh waters or not. Should such a demand «e followed by an attempt to capture the escaped •lave by force, the Admiralty ia confident that British "SMers will know how to do their duty." The widow Wainwright is willing to dispose of the manuscript her husband left behind him on his departure from Newgate, for £ 200. The clergyman Jr lr\^ere8ted himsolf on behalf of herself and family dissuades her from publishing the composition on her own account, on the score that it would not pay. I am sorry to think that the reverend gentleman is wrong. Does any one happen to know whether the Fjir/lish- man has stopped ? Its editor at least appears to be in search of a new occupation. Having libelled the law, Dr. Kenealy is about to do his best to cari- cature religion. He intends, we are told, signalising Easter Sunday by the commencement a series of religious services for the people. The whole of our religious system," proclaims the member for Orton, "is out of joint, as is proved by the worldly conduct of the clergy generally, and the dreadful public crimes which are raging around us not only with impunity, but even with applause. It is time the tide was stemmed, or the fires of Heaven will descend as upon Jerusalem-and the Cities of the *'vi! an^ sweep us into destruction." The jntelligence which this announcement constitutes, that the Orton mania has died out, may be satisfac- tory enough. But the preaching of the Gospel ac- cording to Kenealy oannot be contemplated with equanimity in a country where regard for decency still •xists. A gentleman has lately got into trouble f< >r blaspheming in Billingsgate the protagonist in the evangelical burlesque which is now apparently being ergamsed can hardly be tolerated when impious dray- men are prohibited. Under all reserves," all they say in France, but nevertheless with a pretty strong conviction of the truth of what I advance, Mr. Disraeli has a trump card up his sleeve in certain important and most necessary army reforms, to be introduced before the coming ses- lion is very old.

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