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VARIETIES-GRAVE AND GAY.

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- ASSAULT ON A SIGNALMAN.

A VICTIM OF WILD PHANTASY.

HUMOURS OF THE SCOTCH BENCH.

THE COMIC PAPERS.

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AMERICAN MEAT IN LONDON.

A PREACHER AND THE VACCINATION…

ADVENTURE WITH A " SEA MONSTER."I

THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ACT.

MR. BRIGHT'S BIRMINGHAM SPEECH.

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MR. WADE'S HONOURS.

THE MALAY DISTURBANCES.

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THE MALAY DISTURBANCES. The Bombay Gazette gives the following account of the attack and capture of Paroa :—Rassa, 8th Decem- ber, 1875.—At five a.m. yesterday morning. Lieutenant Hinxman, Lieutenant Peyton, and 45 rank and file of the 10th Regiment; Captain De Fontaine, Mr. Robin- son (second in command of the Arab contingent) and 85 Arabs; Sergeant Bird and 46 policemen, and Captain Murray, in command of the field piece, paraded and started for the village of Paroa, in possession of the *nemy, about three miles from the Klana's residence, on the road to Terachee. Lieutenant Peyton, with a few picked men of the 10th and some Arabs, felt the way in front, as we advanced, to avoid com- ing unexpectedly on the enemy. We were followed by the Klana and some armed Malays, the latter of whom kept carefully out of action until the village was taken, much to everyone's gratification, as they were more likely to injure their friends than their foes by wild and excited firing. Having advanced along the jungle path until within a short distance of Paroa, a halt was called, and Mr. Robinson with 20 Arabs were detached to the right to threaten the enemy's left flank,and make a lodgment in the village if possible. An Arab sergeant and 20 more of the Arabs were sent out to the left to pick their way as best they could round to the enemy's right flank through the thick jungle; both parties having also instructions to penetrate to the rear of the position taken up by the enemy, if possible, and cut off their retreat. The remainder of the force, with the exception of the gun, which came on so slowly that it was decided not to wait for it, advanced slowly along the path leading to the centre of the enemy's stockade, waiting until the two flanking parties came into action. At about 7.30 a.m. the enemy's war gongs and shots on our right were heard, denoting that Robinson's flank- ing party were now in action. The main party now advanced along the narrow path which, just as it emerges from the jungle, passes over a small ridge which is about 170 yards from the front of the enemy's stockade. Between this ridge and the stockade there is only a narrow footpath winding through an almost impassable swamp. Behind the ridge there was good cover, and as the 10th doubled np and lay down behind it, the enemy opened fire on them, which was returned with such a continuous roar of musketry from the Henry Martini that it must have rather astonished the Malays. They were, however, behind a powerful breast-work, and returned the fire with such effect that very soon men of the 10th, Arabs and police, were seen falling off the bank mortally hit and wounded, so that Dr. Hoystead had more work on his hands than he could well manage. The flanking parties were already in action, having worked their way round on to the enemy's flank through jungle and swamp. A steady fire was now kept up from both sides until about ten a.m., when the enemy's began to slacken a little, but, as no one could distinguish whether the shouts on our flanks were from our own Arabs or hostile Malays, the position of our troops was somewhat critical, and reports kept constantly coming in that our flanks were being turned. A bayonet charge across the swamp was decided upon,as a retreat, with such a large number of wounded to carry, and the major ty of the force being an undisciplined rabble, would most probably have turned into a rout. Bayonets were fixed, and a number of the 10th and some Arabs charged across the swamp led by their offi- cers. They reached the first stockade, a square re- doubt flanking the front of the position, bayoneting its occupants, but, owing to the difficult nature of the ground, the casualties in the advance across the swamp were large, so that only Lieuts. Hinxman and Peyton, with 12 of the 10th. along with Capt. DeFontaine and 6 Arabs,reached it. In the meantime Robinson's flanking party made good their footing in a similar out-work on the left of the enemy's position, but as the main work commanded it, the fire was so hot they were obliged to evacuate it. The position of those who had already effected a lodgment in the outworks of the stockade was now critical as they were exposed to the fire of friend and foe because the remainder of the force, owing to the smoke, could not make out where they were. In about a quarter of an hour, to the joy and astonishment of everyone, the gun at last appeared, when Captain Murray and Mr. Skinner set to work, the only difficulty being where to fire in order to avoid hittino1 any of our own side now in the stockade. The first shot went crashing through the centre Btockade, and then was heard a ringing British cheer resound from the left stockade, and we now knew where our friends were. After about nine shots the fire of the enemy visibly slackened, and some more of the 10th being now collected ran into the work already taken, when a second charge was made from it on to the main work, and the enemy then took to their heels, with the exception of some of the Sri Menanti warriors, who stuclr to their posts until bayoneted. As the Malays fled up the hill, carrying their dead and wounded, the Kith kept up a steady fire on them, killing and wounding many. The village and stock- ades were then set on fire amidst British cheers. The roll was then called, and only 31 out of 45 of the 10th answered to their names. The dead and wounded were then collected, and the following is the list of casualties :—loth Regt., 2 killed, 2 mortally wounded, 10 severely ;— Capt. De Fontaine s Arab Force, 5 killed, 5 severely wounded Police Force, 4 killed and 6 wounded. Capt. De Fontaine was hit in the thigh by a bullet, yet not incapacitated from con- tinning his duties throughout the day. Twelve of the enemy's bodies were found in the stockade, which was nnusual, as Malays almost invariably carry oft all their dead and wounded. A pile of 30 more bodies was found higher up the road by some Chinese coolies, and from native sources the enemy's loss is estimated at over 100 dead and wounded. It is reported that all their great fighting men were present at this engagement, and that the chiefs stood behind them, krisses in hand, vowing to slay the first pin- ran away, which perhaps accounts for M aiding at their posts until bayoneted. The 1 were certainly ferocious looking customers 11.1 long matted hair, flowing to their waists, and stripped for fighting, with the exception of a girdle of cloth round their waists. One of them, even when left for dead with a bayonet thrust through his body, recovered suffi- ciently to ci _cp towards a private of the 10th, who was Bitting with his back towards him, kriss in hand, to stab him in the back, but luckily he was seen in time, and half a dozen bayonets put him out of the way of further mischief. The A nibs fought with great bravery, following Captain De Fontaine wherever he led. When the village was burnt the dead were buried where they fell, with three volleys over their grave, as, owing to the number of wound-d. it was impossible to carry them home and after this melancholy ceremony the force marched back to Rassa. Lieutenant Peyton was the first man into the enemy's stockade, closely followed by Captain DeFontanc. The wounded are all doing well. All the bullets extracted were made of tin and generally ran round the ribs of the men hit m the chest, and were successfully extracted. Captain Murray s black retriever dog was seen gallantly leading the charge across the swamp on the stockadesh when he was shot down with a bullet in the leg, but he is doing well and is much petted by the soldiers, who unani- mously recommend him for a V.C.

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PICKETING IN THE BOOT TRADE.

WHAT THE "WORLD" SAYS,

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