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DRUSK OR DYING. t

THE COMIO PAPERS.

SPELLING BEE AT BRISTOL.

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VARIETIES—GR A VE AK"; GAY.…

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THE TESTIMONIAL TO MR. READ,…

A RiVAL TO COD-LIVER OIL.

GROSS RECKLESSNESS BY A MINER.

THE NUMBER OF LANDOWNERS.

PERSONAL STATISTICS.

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MR. CAVE AND THE KriEUIVE.

MR. GLADSTONE AND THE ITALIAN…

POKER VERSUS DOCUMENT.

ERIE RAILWAY COMPANY.

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THE EASTERN QUESTION. ;

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THE EASTERN QUESTION. Lord Stratford de Redcliffe has addressed a letter to we Timet, dated St. Leonard's, Decpmbcr 31st, in which he says — The numerous articles respecting Turkey which have lately appeared in the Times en- title me to think that you will not exclude the fol- lowing remarks. The Times- reopened the Eastern Question by advising a policy of total inaction on the part of England. You have since laboured in many leaders to justify that opinion by dressing Turkey in the most humiliating Colours. That Turkey is weak, fanatical, and misgoverned no one can honestly deny but to try apprehension it would he a great and hazardous mis take to infer from its condi- tion in those respects that the best way for England Is to leave it entirely alone. Anw-g the Turkish Statesmen are some, at least, who, in spi;o of their re- ligious prejudices and defective knowledge, have Slg"- city enough to feel their wants, and prudence enough to bend rather than to break under the force of reasonable pressure. Nor are the Sultan's Mussulman subjects so unmanageable as to give serious alarm to his Government when reforms of an unpopular kind are to be carried into effect. The Eastern Question is a fact, a reality of inde- finite duration. Like a volcano, it has intervals of rest; but its outbreaks are frequent, their occa- sions uncertain, and their effects destructive. The chief Powers of Christendom have all more or less an interest in the fortunes of an empire which, from being systematically aggressive, has become a tottering and untoward neighbour. Its struggles for life, the agonies of its dissolution, could not fail to throw all Europe into a state of hurtful agitation, if not into one of general hostilities. Ambitions, jea- lousies, apprehensions, and other conflicting passions would be roused into fearful activity, and the con- sequence of a fermentation so violent and extensive may well be dreaded. Under these circumstances, for England to be an idle looker-on seems hardly credible. Such an attitude with reference to interests so positive and perils so imminent would be a virtual abdication of her high position and its attendant duties. True it is that of two evils she has only to choose the lesser, but the choice of either would be better than indifference alike degrading and dangerous. War on one side and an injurious dismemberment of Turkey on the other may surely be avoided by British in- fluence, exercised from a suitable position. If the three Northern Powers are left to themselves, they will, of course, be guided by their own views. There is no reason to mistrust Russia at present but Russia la, nevertheless, one of the same triumvirate which partitioned Poland, and the retirement of England might be taken as her opportunity. The moral in- sistance of England would in all likelihood be decisive in a conference of the five or the six Powers. Peace, the support of Turkey, its administrative in particu- lar, its financial improvement, and the equality of all classes of its population, would naturally be the main points of policy; nor is there ground for appre- hending opposition to such principles on the part of others. The Sultan, moreover, would be more likely to assent to measures necessary to secure the exe- cution of reforms when proposed to him by all the Powers and recommended by England, whose counsels have always had a defensive or conservative character —defensive as to the Danube and the Bosphorus, con- servative as to the only feasible prolongation of Turkey's political existence.

A SPELLING BEE AT COLCHESTER.

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