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ABERDARE POLICE COURT.

WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE DEMONSTRATION…

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REPRESENTATION OF BIRMINGHAM.

SIR S. NORTHCOTE ON THE ASHANTEE…

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION IN SCHOOLS.

TAUNTON ELECTION.

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TAUNTON ELECTION. The election of a representative of Taunton, conse- quent upon the acceptance of the office of Solicitor- General by Mr. Henry James, Q.C., took place on Monday. Mr. James's re-election was opposed by Sir Alfred Slade, Bart. The process of the polling was absolutely without incident, Taunton taking as quietly and naturally to its first experience of the Ballot Act as if it had been familiar w ith it throughout its electoral life. Perhaps the rain, which fell heavily, had sometlnng to do with the prevailing dullness—certainly its depth was such that even the band on Monday, recruited by the acces- sions of several brass harfwiments, utterly failed in the endeavour to enlirrr nBathe rival candidates occa- sionally passed to aiiJ^ro, visiting the polling sta- tions, and were cheered when they encountered their adherents but there was no crowd and no excitement, every ope appearing to have arrived at the conclusion that it was impossible to influence the final issue by shouting or idling about, and no they were silent and went about their ordinary business, waiting with patience till the hour for the declaration of the poll should arrive. It was generally agreed that the counting might well be got through by six o'clock, and art that hour the open space in front of the Town Hall began to be crowded, The rain which had fallen with dismal persistency throughout the day had ceased, and it was accepted in certain quarters as an augury of hope that as soon as the poll was closed patches of blue began to be visible in the sky. The crowd thickened till every stone in the Market-place was co- vered, and as the light of day faded out, the lamps shone forth upon a sea of upturned faces, all gazing earnestly upon the doorway from which the momen- tarily expected declaration was to be made. At ten minutes past seven it began to rain again, and just as the spirits of the crowd were drooping* the Town Crier advanced to the top of the steps, and solemnly rang his bell. Then came the bailiffs' struggle to keep their position on the top etep, from which the crowd behind threatened to pitch them, and a dead silence succeeding that confused uproar the long-expected announcement was made:— Mr. James (L) 899 Sir Alfred Slade (C) 812 Majority. 87 ..a an instant the crowd broke up, and there ensued such a storm of cheering and such a scene of shaking hands all the Town Crier, still preserving a dignified position on the steps of the Hall, had never before looked down upon. A rush was made to the London Hotel, whither Mr. James had been Swiftly conveyed whilst the crowd was still intent upon tie announcement- of the issue of the election. The rain had once more cleared off, and the Solicitor-General, coming bareheaded on the balcony of the hotel, was greeted with loud cheers. Addressing an immense crowd, he ■wd* I stand here to-night, I believe, the proudest man in England. I shall not, how- aver, mingle arrogance with my pridé, for I come here, not to triumph over my opponents or uult in the manner in which we have won this contest. I have had to meet misrepresen- tation and abuse, and if I did not feel the responsi- bility at the position I occupy I could say much of the manner in which I have been treated in this bo- rough. I can only express my gratitude to you — for I am indeed deeply grateful to you—for having enabled me, with my poor efforts, to fight against a combination of prejudice and of political party sel- dom witnessed. I have met with kindness in this borough which shall never be forgotten. You have striven with me and worked night and day; and in return 1 can only say Gentlemen, God bless you, and may you be rewarded. Lower down the street, opposite the Castle Hotel, there was ga. 'thered another crowd far smaller in number and much less cheerful in spirits, but they managed to get up a good hearty cheer when Sir Alfred Slade ap- peared on the balcony, and acknowledged himself in the good old phrase, to be defeated" but not" dis- graced." The disgraoe, Sir Alfred Slade said, was for the hundred electors who had personally pledged their votes to him, and who had proved recreant before tht ballot box.

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THE HEALTH OF MR. BRIGHT.

AN AGREEABLE PROSPECT.

A BONAPARTIST MANIFESTO.

THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL AT EXETER.

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MERTHYR POLICE COURT.