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LLANILAR.

HAFOD. "=

GO GIN AN.

ABERAYRON ECHOES.

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BOROUGH MAGISTRATESMDOURT.

LLANBADARN FAWR.I

FAIR WHITE HANDS

THE WELSH EDUCATIONAL CON-…

THE LATE REV. A. H. MACKONOCHIE"

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THE LATE REV. A. H. MACKONOCHIE" Church Times Correspondent" writes:— Dear Sir,—I thought the enclosed cuttings might be interesting in showing the views of widely-differ- ing papers. Ne 1. is taken from the Bristol Times and Mirror," Low Church Tory; No 2. from "The Weekly Times and Echo," Radical and very Broad so far as it ventures on Church questions. The late Mr Mackonoehie was a Scotchman, and never lost the accent of his native heaths. He devoted a large portion of his private income to the bringing up of the children of his brother, the Recorder of Winchester, -who was almost ruined by the failure of the Glasgow Bank. To the end he was an ardent believer in Liberalism and Mr Gladstone. Just twenty years ago be welcomed Mr Beal and his Reformers to a service at St. Alban's. Amongst the London sisterhoods his influence was quite as great as that of Mr Stanton is amongst the men. Personally Mr Mackonochie was no great lover of florid music and ornate ritual, but be implicitly believed in both as a means to an end. His connection with St. Alban's was never really severed. He lived to see his whole parish swept away and rebuilt. The "Times' "ritual articles of 186:J and 1867, as well a8 Mr Thomas Binney's celebrated sermon, might be in-traetiveiy re-read by the light of twenty years. To oblige Bishop Jackson when dying, the crucifix I Jacmg the pulpit and the picture of the Madonna, with the flowers and lights, were removed and have never been replaced." 11 Mr .lack mochie, who died suddenly in a snow- wreath at Ballaehulish on Saturday, was probably, at one and the same time, the most noble-hearted Christian and the most pragmatical stickler for h, f rehnand illegal ritual that the Church of England ever knew. His work in St Alban's, Baldwin's- g-ardens socially, was splendid his influence in the Church of England, though he knew it not, was dis- integrating. In establishing his own independence over all tribunals, he struck a hard blow for Congre- gationalism in the Church. St. Alban's has, indeed for years controlled its own ritual and its own affairs as absolutely as if it were a single example of some Dissenting sect. Ritualism and Mr Mackonochie together have long had their day. Both did some good—they led men to see that religion meant beauty, and many who went thus far with them have gone beyond, and found it meant truth as well." A London Correspondent writes :—"In the sad end of Mr Mackonochie the Ritualists have lost a staunch apostle, the Church of England a devoted son, and the poor an equally devote! friend. When be first began to attra t public attention, many of his own friends spoke of him as of weak judgment -an aimless enthusiast or fanatic. His steady per- severance in the troublous path he chose for his steps proved he bad grit of no common quality, and steadfast principle. But the Ritualistic movement, of which he was a shining light has not resulted in any one radical change in the services of the Church, or alteration in even one item of doctrine. The most it has done is to rouse the careless to threatened dangers from without, and to evolve a deeper spirit of practical service. A familiar and revered figure in and around London Docks has been removed, and at a time when, from the abn rmal condition of work, rm_ the poverty is extreme.

THE FIRE BRIGADE.

I LLANDOVERY.

LLANILAR.

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