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vur Janban Corrtspoubcni.

MR. O'BRIEN SHOT AT IN AMERICA.

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MR. O'BRIEN SHOT AT IN AMERICA. Mr. William O'Brien, editor of United Ireland, who has been elected to Parliament in the Parnellite interest since his departure to America, lectured on Monday night at the Palace Rink, Hamilton,Ontario, to a crowd of about 1500 Irish sympathisers, who loudly applauded him. No prominent citizen was present. On leaving the Rink Mr. O'Brien was pelted with rotten eggs. He otherwise received no hurt, and reached his hotel safely. A crowd of loyalists, mostly youths, was assembled outside, giving cheers for the Queen and Lord Lansdowne, and hooting O'Brien. The town was quiet, the general public being indifferent to the agitation. The surgeon who was called to attend upon Mr. W. O'Brien reports that a blow he received at Toronto has caused a cartilaginous separation and an ) identation of the eighth, ninth, and false ribs, with ] the result of setting up inflammation of the lungs. He advised his patient that any exertion would be dangerous to him. Mr. O'Brien, however, says he will go to Hamilton if it is possible for him to move. The New York Herald says he will be accompanied by a number of armed Americans, who have de- termined to resist by force if they ate attacked. O'Brien was guarded in this way at Toronto by some Americans; but supposing that all danger was over with the meeting, they left him. There is some calk of redress being demanded for the American newspaper men who were hurt when Mr. O'Brien was stoned. A Central News telegram from New York says: After the reception at the railway station of Hamilton, Messrs. O'Brien and Kilbride drove in a cab to their hotel. Being recognised on the way, a crowd soon collected, and the cab was followed by a yelling mob of men and boys, who threw rotten eggs at the vehicle and its occupants. Not content with this rough play some adventurous rascals fired revolvers at the re- treating conveyance. No injury was received by either of the inmates, but the driver, a man named Nelson, was shot in the wrist, with the result that the reins slipped from his fingers. Mr. T. P. O'Brien, the local president of the Irish League, who was also in the cab, seized the reins as they fell, and, lashing the horse into a furious gallop, reached the hotel ahead of the crowd. But the mob continued their rush, and closed round the vehicle as it drew up at the hotel entrance, menacing its occupants as they alighted. McMahon, a prominent Leaguer, who formed one of O'Brien's escort, drew a revolver from his pocket, and as he helped William O'Brien from the cab with one hand levelled his weapon at the crowd with the other, threatening to shoot the first man who interfered. A party of friends gathered round, and the police hur- rying up at the moment, dispersed the mob, who gave a parting volley of rotten eggs at the hotel and the party who had raised their ire. The police did not appear to have been in any way to blame. They had made every preparation for O'Brien's protection, but through a misunderstanding missed hia carriage. On the whole, there was less turbulence at Hamilton than there has been elsewhere. In the evening, replying frlim a balcony of the hotel to an address from the Hamilton branch of the National League, Mr. O'Brien thanked the crowd for the hearty welcome they had given him. Ho hoped that ere long, instead of having to come from Ireland to tell Canada of Ireland's woes, he would be able to invite Canadians to witness the peace and prosperity ot the people of Ireland under a Parliament at College-green. He repeated his accusations against Lord Lansdowne, but was obliged to shorten his address on account of weak- ness. A later telegram says that the attack upon Mr. O'Brien last night at Hamilton was a much more serious affair than at first was supposed. There is reason to believe that a deliberate plot existed to murder him. The attack, it appears, took place upon his leaving the public hall where he had been giving an address, and not upon his departure from the railway station. Signals were raised upon his leaving the hall, and when the cab in which he rode reached the Market-square, firing began. Eight shots were fired, one of which passed through the cab within an inch of Mr. O'Brien's face; another, as known, struck the driver. Witnesses aver that all the shots were delivered from two pistols. The absence of police to protect the Nationalist speaker is thus explained. Towards the close of the meeting a man approached O'Brien on the platform and suggested his leaving by a side door to avoid the crowd in front. At first he demurred, but finally consented. On arriving at the exit, however, he and his friends found themselves confronted by a hostile crowd, who evidently expected them. This being discovered, the party jumped into their cab, and drove with all speed towards their hotel. The police meanwhile were drawn up to keep order at the front of the hall, where O'Brien was ex- pected to emerge, and an escort was in waiting to accompany him. They waited in vain, and only found out what had occurred in time to disperse the angry mob from the front of the hotel which the Irish party had just reached.

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KILLED BY HIS SHIPMATES.

A FOND AND FOOLISH COUPLE.

DESPERATE FIGHT WITH A WOLF.

POLITE PRINCE BISMAHCK

ZULULAND.

~8TATE^JF UiKLAHD.

RELEASE OF FATHER RYAN. !

AGRARIAN OUTRAGES.

THIRTY FAMILIES TURNED OUT.

BURMAH.

SUBSIDENCE OF A PRISON.

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iBURNING OF THE OPERA COMIQUE…

THE ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY

COUGHING IN CHURCH.

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