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- EVACUATION OF THE SOUDAN.

HUNTING DOWN BUSHRANGERS.

1 SETTLEMENT OF THE COLERIDGE…

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THE DEFEAT OF THE GOVERNMENT.

NEW PARASOLS. I

EXPLOSION ON THE INFLEXIBLE.

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EXPLOSION ON THE INFLEXIBLE. A serious explosion occurred on Monday morning on board her Majesty's ship Inflexible, the most powerful vessel of war in the British navy, lying in the extension of Portsmouth Dockyard. The explo- sion occurred in one of the coal bunkers, which was full. A coal-heaver named Jacob Millar was lowered to trim the coal, and soon after he had reached the bottom he gave the word for the shovels and a light to be sent down. This was complied with, and almost immediately another coal-heaver, named Alfred Bennett, was let down into the pit. He had accom- plished about half his journey when a terrific flash, resembmg lightning, was seen to issue from the pit, but no report whatever was heard. The poor fellow who was being lowered into the bunker was fearfully burned. The other man was also severely injured, and both were as soon as possible conveyed on stretchers to the dockyard surgery, where their wounds were dressed by the fleet surgeon. Thirteen men who were working close by were scattered in all directions, and sustained in juries of a m ore or les] serious character. It is supposed that the lids of the bunkers not being perforated so as to admit of venti- lation, the gas accumulated, and became ignited on coming into contact with a naked light. About 1200 tons of coal had been stowed on board when the ox- plosion occurred. The names of the sufferers, besides Millar and Bennett, were John Coleman, leading stoker; J. Baker, James Benge, Frederick Batchelor, George Roberts, stokers Thomas Hislop, John Suddick, Thomas Riggings, William Grant, hired labourers; and Frederick William Luff, shipwright apprentice. In most cases the injuries were of a superficial character. When the Metropolitan Police made the usual search of the ship they found the stokehole was shut and the bunkers covered, thus ex, cluding the possibility of ventilation. Coleman, the chief stoker of the party, states that there was a large flame and but slight report. He attributes the ex- plosion to the naked light being sent down before the bunkers had been cleared of gas. None of the injured men belonged to the Royal navy. They were coal- heavers belonging to the coaling steamers.

A STRANGE STORY FROM KHARTOUM.

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