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SERIOUS COLLIERY DISASTER.I

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DOMESTIC TRAGEDY AT NUNHEAD.

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DOMESTIC TRAGEDY AT NUNHEAD. At the Marlborough Arms, Camberwell, on Wed- nesday Mr. George Perceval Wyatt held two inquests on the bodies of Thomas and Sarah Arlott, husband and wife, aged respectively 65 and 68 years, lately residing at 41 Barsett-road, Nunhead. The death of the latter was due, it is alleged to her husband's violence, while he fearing arrest, committed suicide. Sarah Arlott, daughter of the deceased couple, de- posed that she resided with her parents, who led a very unhappy life. Her mother was a very heavy di inker, and her father was constantly ill-using her; in fact he had treated her badly ever since they had been married. Her father used to kick her mother downstairs, and witness bad often seen him throw chairs at her. On Saturday night witness was returning home, when she met her mother in Rye-lane, Peckham. The latter had been drinking, but she was not intoxicated. She told wit- ness not to go home as her father was drunk. On Sunday morning she saw her mother lying uncon- scious on the floor with her head under a wash-stool. There was a broom lying across her chest, and there were several bruises about her. Her mother was then fully dressed, and seemed to have just come in. Witness picked her up and put her on to a bed which was in the room, and removed a portion of her clothing. Her father went out. De- ceased slept heavily, and did not recover conscious- ness. In the meantime her father returned and went to his room. About one o'clock on Monday morning the heavy breathing stopped, and witness looked at her mother and saw that she was dead. Witness went into her father's room, and told him that she thought that her mother was dead. He became like a madman, and sent his son for a doctor. Dr. Etheridge, the divisional surgeon of police, stated that there were wounds of recent origin on both arms. The left eye was black, and other portions of the body were badly bruised. None of the bones, however, were fractured. Witness was in- formed that it was supposed that the husband of the deceased had, while the latter was sober, and apparently in good health, struck her with the broom. Witness had since made a post- mortem examination. There was a slight mark on the head, which had apparently been caused by a blow, and he found a slight extravasation. There was a livid bruise on the head. The bone of the skull was covered with blood. Both he and Dr. Bond had come to the conclusion that a clot of blood which they found on the brain was due to the violence of a blow. After considerable discussion, the jury re- turned an open verdict as follows "That the death of the deceased was due to a clot of blood on the brain, producing compression from a blow, but there is not sufficient evidence to show how such a blow was sustained." The police had waited for the result of the post-mortem examination before taking any further steps. The post-mortem was concluded at eight o'clock on Wednesday morning, and Chief Inspector Steggles, who had charge of the case, was proceeding from the mortuary to Nunhead for the purpose of arresting the husband on a charge of murder, when he was informed that the man had some hours before committed suicide. With reference to the death of the man the daughter stated that he was a stone- mason's labourer. On Tuesday night witness returned home with her brother, and before she went to bed she saw her father. He said, Good night. Go and rest yourself. This will be a locking-up job." Witness said, Serve you right, father. You have served me cruelly all my life." In the early morning she was awakened and saw her father in her room. He crept round the bed and looked at her. Witness put the clothes tightly round her throat, as she thought he might do some- thing to her, but he left the room without speaking. At half-past eight o'clock witness again woke up, and on going downstairs saw her father lying in the back kitchen on his right side with his throat fearfully cut. He was quite dead. A brother and a sister of his had committed suicide. Dr. Etheridge said there were seven or eight different cuts, but the main TTound was two and a half inches deep. A verdict of "Suicide whilst mentally deranged" was returned.

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