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--------A JOURNEY THROUGH…

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A JOURNEY THROUGH SENEGAL. Dr. Colin, a doctor in the French navy, has just returned from an expedition to the Western Soudan, having explored a portion of the valley of the Faleme, one of the principal affluents of the Senegal, and the auriferous region between that river and the Bafing. He started from Podor on the 24th of June, 1883, with a convoy of twelve negroes and twelve beasts of burden, following the left bank of the Senegal as far as Bakel and crossing the Fouta, where the natives of the Toucouleurs tribe gave them a great deal of trouble. His only white companion also injured himself at this point and had to go back to St Louis. From Bakel Dr. Colin made his way to Senudebu, at one time a French fort, but now unoccupied. As the Toucouleurs men who accompanied him refused to enter the Malinke territory, he left his beasts of burden and material there and made his way to the French station at Medina, where he found a fresh convoy. At Dialafara, the capital of the Tam- baoura, he was very cordially received by the ehief of that country, who signed a treaty placing himself under the protectorate of France, with the exclusive right to make roads and work the gold mines, which Dr. Colin described as being very valuable. The natives are, he said, very much in- clined to open commercial relations with France, so as to be able to send their products to the factories of the Senegal. The Malinkes, to whom Dialafara belongs, are described by him as believing in a superior Power, but as not practising any outward rite. The negro type predominates among them, but there are also many who have intermarried with Arabs. From Dialafara Dr. Colin proceeded to Kassama, the capital of the Diebedugu, situated a day's march from Kundian, one of the strongest cities in the States of the King of Segu. Dr. Colin was the first European to visit this place, and he was so well received by the King that he remained there a month, studying the resources of the country, which, he says, abounds with cattle, indigo, cotton, and guttapercha. The two thousand Malinkes of Kassama live in peace with the Toucouleurs of Kundian, though, as a rule, the two tribes are very hostile to one another. The gold mines are about six miles to the south of Kassama, at the foot of the mountain chain which divides the valleys of the Faleme and the Bafing. The gold is exchanged for salt, of which there is none in the country, and 12s. worth of gold can be had for a quantity of salt worth only Is. at St. Louis. From Kassama Dr. Colin explored the course of the river Faleme, and his description of this stream and of the valley through which it runs should have great attrac- tions for the hunters of big game, as elephants, lions, panthers, wild cattle, and antelopes are very abundant there. Returning to Bakel for fresh provisions, he found it impos:ible again to ascend the Faleme as he had intended, owing to the rainy season setting in, so he made his way down to St. Louis, taking with him the son of the King of Kassama, who came to offer allegiance to France on behalf of his father. He also had as his companion from Bakel to St. Louis a Moor from Timbuctoo, who had been deputed by the corporation of merchants there to ask the Governor of St. Louis to open a trade route to their city by the Niger. This Moor stated that if such a route were to be opened all the trade of Tim- buctoo would pass that way instead of through Morocco, and he added that the upper waters of the Niger are navigable from Timbuctoo to Bamaku.

---..----------ART EDUCATION…

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