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!Q.} tt r yonion Coucsptait.

.-------"-REPORTED ASSASSINATION…

SERIOUS ACCIDENT AT WIMBLEDON.

[No title]

SUICIDE FROM HIGHGATE ARCHWAY.

THE INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EXHIBITION.

THE CHOLERA IN FRANCE.

MASONIC CEREMONY AT REDIIILL,

HOME-MADE DRINKS FOR THE HARVEST.

[No title]

THE JUDGES AND THE ASSIZES.

M. PASTEUR'S HYDROPHOBIA EXPERIMENTS.

TRAGIC SUICIDE IN DUBLIN,

A SHOCKING DEATH.

SENTENCE ON LORD ST. LEONARDS

THE PEERS AND THE FRANCHISE…

ANOTHER MILITARY EXECUTION…

OPENING OF A MUSEUM AT ! MANCHESTER.I

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OPENING OF A MUSEUM AT MANCHESTER. An art museum which has been erected by the City Corporation in Queen's-park, Manchester, was opened on Saturday by the Right Hon. A. J. Mun- della, M.P. At the same time Mr. Mundella in- augurated an exhibition of objects of art and pictures within the building. # Queen's-park is in a densely-populated part of the city, and in providing this museum the Corporation have been guided by the desire to carry civilising and elevating influences to the doors of the people, Tho museum has been erected at a cost of about -EGOOO. The authorities of the South Kensington Museum have actively assisted in the organisation of the present exhibition. They have sent down speci- mens of the art work of India--in metal, textiles, ivory, and wood — illustrations of the porce- lain of England, China, and other countries; and a number of electrotype reproductions of decorative and other objects of art in British and other collections. Modern pictures, mostly from local galleries, tapestry, and other things are also exhibited. Two rooms are occupied by the Manchester Art Museum Committee—a body quite distinct from the Corporation- -to whom pictures and other works of art have from time to time been intrusted for the pur- pose of being displayed in a museum in a populous district. The committee are to use the rooms for a couple of years, during which they will demonstrate the system on which, in their view, a popular museum should be conducted. They have arranged and labelled their pictures so that they shall convey as much in- struction as possible to the visitors. They also illus- trate in their exhibits a. number of the leading art pro- cesses, such as etching, engraving, and lithography. Mr. Mundella, in replying to an address, said that the opening of that museum f'irnished an additional illustration of the noble part which Manchester has taken in the great educational movements of the time. The establishment of that museum in the centre of a dense industrial population reflected the highest honour upon the wisdom and the enlighten- ment and liberality of the civic authorities of the city. The home of science and beauty and pictorial art, it would prove a. centre of attraction to the two millions of people to be found in half an hour of its doors. It would tend to awaken and educate their tastes, and would afford them access to pleasures which refined and elevated, and would wean them from those which debased and degraded. It had afforded the greatest pleasure to the Lord President and himself and the officials of the Science and Art Department to assist the Corporation of Manchester in that undertaking, and he could promise a con- tinuance of that assistance to the fullest extent. He then declared the museum open. In the evening Mr. Mundella was entertained at a banquet in the Town Hall by the Corporation, and, in responding to the toast of his health, proposed by the Mayor, said that in every department of education there was intellectual life and vigour and activity which proved to everyone that England did not mean to be behind any of the nations of the world in the matter of education, and he knew from careful obser- vation and daily experience that in proportion as the knowledge and intelligence of our people increased so did their virtue, their temperance, and their religious sentiments. We were reclaiming from squaior, misery, and barbarism tens of thousands of children who but for our voluntary and Board schools and other kindred institutions would grow up to be a scandal and danger to our civilisation. But progress was not made without a good deal of antagonism; a good deal of opposition, misrepresentation, and prejudice was met with. We had not yet convinced every one that education was a good thing; but there could be no fanaticism so blind, no statesmanship so rash, no economy so pitiful as that which would give with one hand the power to wield the destinies of this Empire into the hands of the people, and with the other would stint their education and hinder their acquisi- tion of intellectual power. The Technical Commis- sion to which his friend Professor-and shortly to be Sir Henry-Roscoe did yeoman's service, reported that wherever they went, and especially in democratic counties, they found that the rich regarded education as their greatest safeguard, and the poor as their best inheritance. It was too late to roll back the tide of education, the work done could not be undone and he congratulated Manchester upon the part it had taken in that work.

ACTION FOR DAMAGES.

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