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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

MONDAY NIGHT'S DIVISION.

[No title]

NORTH WARWICKSHIRE ELECTION.

THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL ON THE…

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THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL ON THE FRANCHISE BILL. Sir Henry James, the Attorney-General, presided at the last of the present season's series of house dinners at the National Liberal Club on Wednesday evening. In responding for the toast of Her Majesty's Government," which was proposed by Mr. Theodore Fry, M.P., the Attorney-General first alluded to the exceptional difficulties which the present Government has been obliged to encounter. In referring especially to the Franchise Bill, he said they had now before them the serious task of endeavouring to do justice to the claims of two millions of qualified citizens, and at the same time by moderation and firmness to preserve one of our institutions which Tory peers, in spite of all ap- peals, seemed willing at this grave crisis to endanger by their conduct. After the Conservative legislation of 1867, it was impossible to leave the franchise where it stood, and the Conservatives must bear their full share of responsibility for the legislation which the House of Commons had now so unmistakably ap- proved. The power of the press and of popular edu- cation had made marked progress since 1867, and the Liberal party would have failed to fulfil the terms upon which they obtained power and office if they had longer delayed the act of justice which the House of Lords now threatened to defeat. The Government had carefully endeavoured to perform their duty in that matter with the least possible hostility to_the vested interests, and even to the prejudices of the Tories; indeed, scarcely any member of the Opposition in the House of Commons had ventured to declare himself adverse to the just- ness of the claims of the householders in counties. Practical politicians on the Conservative side had admitted that it would take nearly six months to pass a Redistribution Bill; and considering the time that it had already taken to get a third reading of the Franchise Bill, it was obviously impossible that both measures could be passed in one session. The Go- vernment had, however, deferred the operation of the Franchise Bill, so that it might come into force concurrently with the Redistribution, to which they had distinctly promised to devote next session. Although the House of Lords was not subject to popular election, its members should recollect that they were trustees for the people, and therefore ought to pay due regard to the just and reason- able demands of the people. Their lordships must be made aware of the fact that there was a decided and irresistible popular demand for equal electoral rights in counties and boroughs. It was to be hoped that something might occur either this session or in some shortly coming session which would prevent that collision between one branch of the Legislature and the great mass of the people of which the Conservative peers seemed ready to provoke. No one seemed so well qualified as Mr. Gladstone to deal with the question of redistribution, and it was to be hoped that that illustrious statesman might be allowed to crown his great career by that measure and by the enfranchisement of two millions of people.

THE DISASTROUS FLOODS IN POLAND.

POISONED IN A SEWER.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS.

ACCIDENT AT THE HEALTH EXHIBITION.

EPITOME OF NEWS.