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THE FRENCH DEFEAT NEAR HANOI.

PROPOSED BRITISH SCHOOL AT…

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IRISH LACE EXHIBITION IN LONDON.

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EARL SPENCER AT LIMERICK.

THE GROWTH OF MORMONISM.

-THE FISHERIES CONGRESS.]

HARVEST PROSPECTS,

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REDUCTION OF RAILWAY RATES.

THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS IN RUSSIA.

A BODY FOUND IN A BOX.

¡.' SIR THOMAS BRASSEY ON…

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THE WAR IN THE SOUDAN.I

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THE WAR IN THE SOUDAN. « According to intelligence received at Alexandria from the Soudan, Hicks Pasha, Colonel Farquhar, and Captain Evans returned to Khartoum on May 31. The native tribes were quiet and were making submis- sion.-Writing from Khartoum en May 23, the Special Correspondent of the Daily News giveit some farther particulars of the recent victory of Hicks Pacha over the troops of the Mahdi.—We make the following extracts therefrom Resuming my narrative of the late battle, I have to add that it was not till we had ridden from with- out the square that we began to realise the im. portance of our victory. Accompanying the expedi- tion was a prominent friendly chief, Ahmet-Wed. el-Lebekh, Sheik of the Lakhawin tribe, who, pausing by the bodies of the various leaders, gave their names and explained their position and influ- ence. All were the chosen men of the Mahdi, and whether as dervishes or fanatical preaohers of the rebellion, or as dauntless warriors, they were one and all chiefs of the highest mark. Altogether there were twelve of them, nine belonging to Sennaar and three who had just come from Kordofan, the latter especi- ally despatched by the Mahdi to excite the enemy to a final stand on the west bank of the White Nile with promises of invulnerability to all, and oonfusion add destruction to the "great magician," that is to say to "General Hicks Pacha." There they lay in their patchwork-coloured robes of honour pierced by the bullets that were to have fallen harmlessly at their feet; there they lay, stricken in many places, surrounded by these who had blindly followed them to certain death, shouting verses from the Koran and waving banners inscribed with some inspiring religious text. All had fallen with their heads towards the square, and from twenty paces in front of our line up to 590 yards distant the ground was covered with their dead. On our left, numbers had fallen in a patch of tall yellow grass, whichfcfired by the bursting shells, made it somewhat dangerous to explore. Others who had received their death billet at the opening of the engagement beyond 500 yards had been dragged back into the wood by their comrades, and nearly all the wounded either crept or were carried off. But judging from what we ourselves could see, the number of killed must have exceeded 250, and it was afterwards reported by friendly Arabs that the dead numbered 300 and the wounded 500; the latter, carried off on camels mostly died by the way. Of the forces that attacked us it would be almost impossible to arrive at a correct computation. There may have been from three to five thousand at the first rush from the wood, and possibly behind these may have been others ready to swoop down as the leading lines opened the way. But these lines, first staggered by the shells, then shattered and broken by the rifle bwllets as they entered our zone of fire, gave but sorry encouragement to those who were to follow and though other masses were seen to debouch from the cover, they extended rapidly to right and left, hastily retiring to the shelter they had quitted. Of those who led the way, nothing could exceed the gallantry, and even the heroism. Among other instances of heroism and devotion may be mentioned that of a femate slave, who, regardless of the shower of bullets whistling wound her, brought to her wounded master a gourd of water, and calmly seating herself by his side took the unconscious head on her lap. Again a gaunt-like figure stalking through the dead and dying came almost to the square, seeking coolly, and apparently unconscious of the fire some wounded or dead relation, until finally he fell himself. Another warrior, find- ing that death did not come quick enough, strode, brandishing his lance, to within a dozen paces, and though assured of safety if he threw down his weapon and surrendered, simply answered with defiance, and continued to chant his hopes of Paradise until a bullet laid him low. Passing over the dead, we discovered at every step indications of the passage of the wounded. That night we encamped by the river, General Hicks leaving by steamer for a ford some miles above, across which it was possible the enemy might endeavour to cross into Kordofan. The Pacha took with him two Nordenfeldts, a rifled howitzer, and 150 Bashi-Bazouks.

THE FISHMONGERS' COMPANY.

THE RESOURCES OF MADAGASCAR.

THE REVENUE.

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- WOMAN'S POSITION IN AMERICA.

DOGS IN TRAMCARS.

EVENING OPENING OF MUSEUMS*

DEATH OF SIR WILLIAM KNOLLYS.

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THE ROYAL CALEDONIAN BALL.

COMPARATIVE THIRST IN FRENCH…

MILITARY AFFRAY IN IRELAND.

OVERHEAD WIRES in the METROPOLIS.

—*^ CANADIAN ITEMS.

THE IRISH. LAND ACT.

POSTAL SAVINGS BANKS IN FRANCE.

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