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THE FRENCH DEFEAT NEAR HANOI.

PROPOSED BRITISH SCHOOL AT…

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IRISH LACE EXHIBITION IN LONDON.

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EARL SPENCER AT LIMERICK.

THE GROWTH OF MORMONISM.

-THE FISHERIES CONGRESS.]

HARVEST PROSPECTS,

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HARVEST PROSPECTS, Under the above heading the Daily News has an article from which we make the following extracts:- In some districts, perhaps, farmers have not yet bad as much rain as they desired but a showery period appears to have set in, so that every one will probably have enor.gh before settled weather comes again, as we hops it will come, in time for the bloom- ing of the wheat p'ant, now about to commence in the early districts. Already a most beneficial change is apparent, and farmers generally are in excellent spirits. It ia a pleasure to walk through the cornfields jnst now. v The autumn-sown wheat is coming into ear on strong, healthy straw-too thin in places, it is true, but as thick as need be in others. Spring wheat is thick and as promising as that h&Zivrdou3 crop usually is. Barley and oats are remarkably well planted and healthy almost every- where: bea-na are full of vigour, though rather short nfter bo much dry weather and peas, aa usual, vary considerably, bat are on the whole quite up to •veritge condition for the time of the year. All these crops are late, though instead of being a month late, as they were at the end of Apnl,nhey are now about a fortnight behind their usual stage of growth for the la,it week ef Jur e. These remarks apply, as a rule, t" nearly ail England and Wales, excepting the northern counties, which, with the greater part of fccotUr.d. lU1..Vfl a. decidedly poorer prospect at the prc-.««nt time, as they suffered more from the ungenial weat-har that prevailed through a portion of tho spring, at ri was prolonged with them after a favourable change set in further south. Of the root crops it is too eaivy to speak with any con-lance, and it Is not easy so give in a few words t't' t,i-!t of the various, and to some extent conflicting, reports that have been published in relation to them. Mat■■colds and Swedish turnips have generally planted wel;, hat h,ve ii, gerwn very rapidly as a rale. In sorue districts tiey are lemaikahly healthy, while in others they have been attacked- by insect enemies. Ev-rvtSlteie, ho*'?vt r, they have been greatly bene- fited hp the mb, which ha? come juss in time, too, to farmers to sytv white ttsroipa under favourable eccdi-.ions. } Hay nearly everywhere ia a very light crop on the pastiiies, clovers and cultivated grasses being fairly good, though not up to their early promise. Hay- making has been interrupted by the showers, but very little damage is reported at present, and farmers were too glad of the rain for their corn 'and root crops to grumble about a little hindrance te haymaking. Potatoes have seldom had a season better suited to them, excepting early crops, which were cut by the May frost. The land worked like an ash-heap when the tubers were sown. The dry weather that followed was well suited to keep the plants healthy, and the recent rain had been just what was needed to increase the yield. With fine weather as a rule up to the time for raising the tubers, we should have a great orop of potatoes, which will be of vast importance in Ireland and Scotland. The hop.gardens of Kent, Surrey, Sussex, and Hampshire present a remarkable contrast to their appearance last year. The vines, almost everywhere, are strong and healthy in colour, while there are but few complaints of fly." In fact, present appearances denote a better hop crop than we have had for many years. From the fruit districts reports are variable except that a great apple crop is to be expected. Fears are fairly plentiful in some orchards, and thin on the trees in others. Stone fruit is rather scarce. Bush fruits are fairly plentiful, black currants being abundant. After the rain strawberries should also be plentiful. Early market-garden produce has been somewhat scarce, the spring frosts and the drought having alike been unfavourable to most of these vegetables. On the whole, agricultural prospects are decidedly cheering. Everything depends on the weather up to harvest, and especially during the critical blooming stage of the corn crops but if we should be favoured with an abundance of sunshine and a few showers occasionally, and should still further be blessed with a dry harvest, the produce of our fields and gardens will be far beyond the average of recent years.

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REDUCTION OF RAILWAY RATES.

THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS IN RUSSIA.

A BODY FOUND IN A BOX.

¡.' SIR THOMAS BRASSEY ON…

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THE WAR IN THE SOUDAN.I

THE FISHMONGERS' COMPANY.

THE RESOURCES OF MADAGASCAR.

THE REVENUE.

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- WOMAN'S POSITION IN AMERICA.

DOGS IN TRAMCARS.

EVENING OPENING OF MUSEUMS*

DEATH OF SIR WILLIAM KNOLLYS.

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THE ROYAL CALEDONIAN BALL.

COMPARATIVE THIRST IN FRENCH…

MILITARY AFFRAY IN IRELAND.

OVERHEAD WIRES in the METROPOLIS.

—*^ CANADIAN ITEMS.

THE IRISH. LAND ACT.

POSTAL SAVINGS BANKS IN FRANCE.

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