Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

THE CHANNEL TUNNEL.

LORD CARNARVON ON EDUCATION.

AGRICULTURAL PROSPECTS.

SEA-WATER BENEFICIAL TO SMALL.…

Advertising

PRACTICAL COOKERY.

THE LATE SEIZURE OF ARMS IN…

THE BRITISH MUSEUM.

M. DE LESSEPS ON THE PANAMA…

News
Cite
Share

M. DE LESSEPS ON THE PANAMA AND SUEZ CANALS. On Monday M. de Lesseps received a deputation from the executive committee of the International Arbitration and Peace Association, and had a two hours' conversation with them. The conference had been primarily arranged with a view to arrive at some common basis of action in order to secure, first, the unmolested completion, second the permanent neu* trality of the Panama Canal and its adjuncts. M. de Lesseps gave a full history of the Panama question and of the attitude of the United States and the posi- tion of England with regard to influence over the isthmus. Being asked if, as the essence of the Monroe doctrine is the desire to assure the American Continent from the intrusion of any and all belligerent European Powers, the United States publicists would not be willing to strive for the absolute neutralization of the Canal-that is, to forbid its use at any and all times for the passage of war vessels and material of war- M. de Lesseps replied in the negative. He did not think such entirely non-combatant principles could be admitted. As indicating the practical line to be worked, he said they will propose to place the Canal (and, doubtless, its banks and approaches) in the same international or all-nations category as jurists do the high seas. As regards the Suez Canal, M. de Lesseps expressed the strongest possible objection to the intervention of any foreign Power whatever, not excepting Turkey. He asserted that Egypt, by the Assembly of Notables, was properly working out its own national life, that Arabi Pasha had only taken that part which as Minister of War and a patriotic leader he was per- fectly justified in taking. Speaking from full and in- timate knowledge of Egypt and its population M. de Lesseps asserted that, just as the massacre at Alexandria was the inevitable though deplorable result of the excitement caused by the presence of the combined fleets, so any attempt to land European or even Turkish troops would be fol- lowed by greater calamities. The Canal he contended is perfectly safe, but only on the condition that no armed intervention takes place. M. de Lesseps and his correspondents believe that especially if English troops are landed with the object of protecting the mouth of the Canal all its navigation will be at once arrested, with consequences to the world's commerce which would be deplored. On the further question as to the probable results of British intervention alone, M. de Lesseps thought that this would arouse great opposition from France, even if such intervention should be advised by the Conference or a majority of the Powers.

THE POISONOUS CONSTITUENTS…

PARLIAMENTARY CONSTITUENCIES-

ANOTHER MURDER IN DUBLIN.

A VESSEL STRUT M BY LIGHTHINK

GREAT FIRE IN AMERICA.

LORD SHAFTESBURY ON THRIFT.…

FRENCH HONOURS FOR AN ENGLISH…

[No title]