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INDIAN TROOPS FOR EGYPT.

SIR RIVERS WILSON ON THE EGYPTIAN…

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AMERICAN NEWS.

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CETEWAYO'S VISIT TO ENGLAND.

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jlMPESIAL PARLIAMENT.

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CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS.

A MILITARY VIEW OF AN ENGLISH…

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THE SALVATION ARMY AT THE…

THE PARCELS POST.

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SUFFERINGS AT SEA:

THE LATE FLOODS IN TRAVANCORE.

THE LATE GENERAL GARIBALDI.

AN AESTHETIC FARM.

EPITOME OF NEWS. Evw

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EPITOME OF NEWS. E v w BRITISH AND FOREIGN. The corner-stone of the Garfield Memorial Church was laid at Washington on Sunday, the anniversary of the late President's assassination. The two hundredth division of the present session was taken in the House of Commons on Friday night in last week. An international exhibition of means and appliances for the protection and preservation of human life was opened at the Alexandra Palace on Saturday. The revenue of New South Wales for the 12 months ending 30th ult., has been larger by £1,000,000 than that of the previous year. The town clerk of Newcastle is officially informed that the Queen has been pleased to grant the charter con- ferring upon that borough the dignity of a city. A Parliamentary return, issued on Wednesday morning, shows that during the five month s ended March last, 1,048 tenants were evicted in Ireland, who have not since been readmitted as tenants. An electrical railway is to be constructed in Holland, running from Haarlem to the sea-bathing station of Zandvoort. Last week's receipts of cotton at all United States ports were 9.000 bales since 1st September, 4,571,000 bales. Week's exports to Great Britain, 32,000 bales week's exports to the Continent, 15,000 bales. Total since 1st September, 3,321,600 bales. Stock at all ports, 306,000 bales. A few days ago, a Manchester paper says, a trout, weighing 21b. 9oz., was caught by the rod in one of the tributaries of the Tweed. When cut up there was found in its stomach no fewer than 11 of its own species, measuring from 4in. to 7in. in length, and an ordinary-sized minnow as well-12 fish inside of one. The Daily Hews says that it has been arrranged that the presentation to Mr. Bright in commemoration of the completion of his twenty-fifth year as representative of Bir- mingham shall take place about the end of October or the beginning of November. The proposal that 15,000 Volunteers should take part in the manoeuvres at Aldershot on August 7 has fallen through and instead thereof it is intended that 3,000 Volunteers shall encamp at Hounslow on the 5th proximo, march from Chobham on the 6th, take part in the manoeuvres on the 7th, and return on the morning of the 8th August. For the first time this season ice was on Monday called into requisition to reduce the temperature in the House of Commons. Nearly a ton was used in the course of the sitting. A Rose Show, which was quite a success both as regards the number and quality of the exhibits, was held on Saturday at the Crystal Palace. The number of exhibits, many of which were of rare excellence, was over 200 not to mention flowers which had been sent in other than roses, and which were therefore not for competition. Sir Saul Samuel, K.C.M.G., Agent-General for New South Wales, has been informed by telegram of the arrival in Sydney of the ship Samuel Plimsoll, which sailed from Plymeuth with emigrants in April last. The Standard says that the prospect of attempting to deal with the Procedure Rules before August is now practically abandoned, and an autumn session appears assured. A Reuter's telegram from Honolulu, dated June 21, says: — Captain Hope, of her Majesty's corvette Champion, died here on the 12th inst. from the effects of injuries received in a fall while riding. On Saturday was issued to Parliament copies of correspondence respecting the treatment of Jews in Russia. A costly cigar case was presented by the Czar Alexdander III. a short ago to Count Loris Melikoff. It was a bequest of the late Emperor Alexander II., and several other personages to whom the deceased monarch was attached have received similar bequests. A New York telegram says that the visible supply of wheat on Jane 30 was 10,600,000 bushels, as against 10,200,000 bushels the previous week. Visible supply of Indian corn, 8,100,000 bushels, as against 9,400,000 bushels the previous week. The export clearances of wheat for Europe during last week amounted to 670,000 bushels; the exnort clearances of Indian corn for Europe during last week amounted to 90,000 bushels. Lord Randolph Churchill, the member for Wood- stock, returned to the House of Commons on Monday even- ing for the first time since his recent severe indisposition, and received tke congratulations of many friends from dif- ferent parts of the Chamber. From the Italian Census of the 31st December, 1881, it appears that in 23 out of 24 provincial chief towns the number of persons knowing how to read and write has greatly increased since 1871. Cotton manufacture is rapidly developing in Italy. In the first five months of 1882 there has remained in the country 206,000 cwt. of grey foreign cotton, with an increase of 68,000 cwt. over the corresponding period of 1881. At the same,time the importation of foreign fabrics decreased by 8,000 cwt. Windsor and Eton were on Saturday enlivened by the advent of a considerable number of "bean-feasters" from London. Her Majesty, while driving in the evening with Princess Beatrice through High-street, Slough, en- countered several of these convivial parties returijing to London. One of the vehicles contained some musicians who, as soon as the Queen was seen approaching, played the National Anthem with their cornets, a compliment which Her Majesty graciously acknowledged, the Royal equipage slackening its speed and passing slowly by the excursionists, who cheered the Queen heartily as she proceeded on her way to Windsor. A very unusual occurrence was witnessed at Charlton, Dover, the other day. About mid-day a wild rabbit was noticed running down the Tower Hamlets-road, a thickly populated neighbourhood, at a headlong pace, hotly pursued by a couple of large rats. On the rabbit reaching the end of the road where it joins the High-street it seems to have been scared, and made a sudden turn into the yard of a public-house. The rats did not attempt to follow it here, but gave up the pursuit, seeking refuge in the base- ment of a house on the qpposite side of the road. The rabbit had apparently had a sharp run for dear life," for when it entered the yard it was quite exhausted, and easily captured by the landlord. It is stated that the City of London Corporation, pending the decision of Parliament upon the Electric Light Bill, do not propose to enter into any engagement with regard to further lighting the City, but they express them- selves decidedly favourable to the houses on the line of route of the cables being supplied from the public wires and also to undertaking the work connected with the laying down of the cables. The Court Journal says that gentlemen who have no intention to buy anything at fancy fairs, or have spent all the money they brought with them, hang a card at their button-hole with the word No upon it, to which thev silently point when appealed to. The notion is plagarized from the placard please to pity the poor blind." On Saturday evening, during a thick fog, the iarge ironshvp S°che, 1,600 tons register, bound from Rouen to Cardiff, in water ballast, ran on the rocks near Hartland Point, in the Bristol Channel, and became a complete wreck. The crew, consisting of twenty-three hands, were saved wkh difficulty by climbing up over the rocks, a height of over a hundred feet. Mr. Cyril W. Herbert, the youngest son of Mr. J. R. Herbert, R.A., died on Sunday, of peritonitis, after an illness of a few days, at the age of 31. He was one of our most promising young artists, and was, like his two brothers, trained in his father's studio. His first picture, Home- wards," Roman cattle driven back after the day's labour, was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1870. Of late he was engaged in teaching the students from the antique at the Royal Academy, where he held the position of Curator, bringing to the office a comprehensive knowledge of the sciences which directly pertain to art, viz, anatomy, per- spective, and the effccts of light upon colour.—Obituary of The Times, July 4. Circulating libraries of an entirely new description are about to be started at St. Petersburg. A society has been founded for the purpose of supplying the tramcars of that city with supplies of daily newspapers and illustrated weeklies. Passengers who avail themselves of these literary stores are to drop into a box a copeck for each paper they read. No watch is to be kept over the box, the payment being left to the honour of the readers. The additions to the Zoological Society's Gardens Regent's Park, London, during last week included a vellow baboon, from West Africa, presented by Mr. A. Colllnson a slender loris, from Ceylon, presented by Mrs. A H Jamrach a vulpine phalanger, from Australia, presented by Mr E. Meek; a Burmese tortoise, from the Western Dooars of Bhotan, presented by Mr. B. H. Carew a —— tree snake, from Pemambueo; presented by Mr. C. A Craven a common adder, British, presented by Mr. p. w. Elliott'; a rude fox, a common rhea, from South America, deposited; a yellow baboon, from West Africa, received on approval; a Burrhel wild sheep, born in the Gardens eight summer ducks, six Swinhoe's pheasants, bred in the Gardens. The following insects have emerged during the past week Silk I moths, butteriies. of lMndoa (Sir John Ellis) enter- tamed the Attorney General and other members of the Bar to the number of 120, at dinner in the Egyptian Hall of the itx ansion House last Saturday. itx ansion House last Saturday. Herbert Gladstone has given notice of a Bill to repeat the Section of the Friendly Societies Act of 1875 which require the presentation of quinquennial returns regarding siekness .and mortality. 8 ° In several parts of Switzerland the crops and even potatoes in the ground have been destroyed by hailstorms. Mr. Burr, -plerk to the Keighley Local Board, has been informed tttat the Privy Council had granted a charter of incorporation uo Keighley. The town, which contains a population of 25,000, will be constituted a borough from the 1st of November next. A geld and silver casket, which the members of the Liverpool Land League intend to present to Mr. Parnell, has been finished. On one of the panels is chased an admir- able likeness of Mr. Parnell on another is an inscrip- tion. The top is crowned with a shamrock wreath, and bears the Parnell crest. In the casket will be placed one hundred guineas. General Sir Evelyn and Lady Wood arrived at Windsor Castle on Monday evening, and were included in her Majesty's dinner party. The mineral statistics of the colony of Victoria shew that the quantity of gold raised during 1881 exceeded the yield of 1880 by 30,000oz. The yields in the principal mining districts continue to improve. There were nineteen British and foreign actual shipwrecks reported during last week, making a total of 786 for the present year, or a decrease of 133 as compared with the corresponding period of last year, the increase for the week being six. British-owned vessels numbered eleven. Three were steamers, all British, with an aggreeate tonnage of 1,080 tons. Total tonnage lost for the week 9,503 tons. Total number of lives lost and missing, 57. The annual Strawberry Fete of the Royal Horti- cultural Society, to which only Fellows and their friends are admitted, took place at Chiswick on Saturday afternoon and evening, and was attended by a large number of persons, who, while enjoying in tents or in the open air some of the choicest specimens of what gives its name to the occasion, listened to a programme of music performed by the band of the Hon. Artillery Company. All the strawberries had been grown in the Society's gardens, and there was a large sale both for consumption on the spot and for home use. In London, at an early hour on Saturday morning an elderly man, dressed in a suit of black clothes, was seen wandering on the Victoria Embankment at Westminster. He proceeded towards Adelphi-stairs, but before reaching the stone steps he suddenly mounted the parapet of the Embankment wall and leaped into the Thames and was drowned. The body was recovered by the police about an hour afterwards. The activity and manufacturing enterprise of the Swiss nation in catering for the wants of other countries is aptly illustrated by a return lately issued in connexion with the then pending treaty negotiations between Switzerland and France. In the silk trade no less than 70,000 persons are employed, who produce goods of the annual value of five and a quarter millions sterling. Of this quantity not less than 85 to 90 per cent, goes abroad.- Warehousemen and Drapers' Trade Journal The Rowland Hill Memorial Committee held their final meeting at the Mansion House, in London, on Monday. There remains a balance of £14,575 to form the nucleus of a fund to relieve distressed Post Office employes and their widows-a sum which was declared to be quite inadequate to meet all the necessitous cases that arose. A horse driven by Dr. Freeborn took fright on Monday at Oxford, and the carriage to which it was at- tached ran over Mr. J. E. Henderson, of Magdalen College, who was very much hurt, and is not expected to recov-Br. Dr. Freeborn was also injured, but not so seriously as Mr. Henderson. All the silverware given to a bride at a recent wedding in St. Louis was bagged by a burglar the day the wedding came off. A few days later the bridegroom received an insulting letter, accusing him of palming off plated ware on an innocent burglar, and telling him where he could find his confounded pot-metal in a lumber yard. The man went and got back his presents. The London newspapers evidently believe in the possibility of an armed expedition to Egypt (remarks the Court Journal). They are marshalling their special corres- pondents against eventualities, and some of the gentlemen are prepared to start at an hour's notice. Mr. Longfellow's Home is to be preserved intact for posterity by the Longfellow Memorial Association, which has been formed at Cambridge, in Massachusetts. The Association intends to buy up part of the poet's grounds, in order to erect a suitable memorial, and to keep the property for public use, while arrangements will be made with the Longfellow family to buy the house as soon as they wish to part with it. Lord Shaftesbury presided on Monday over the annual meeting cf the Metropolitan Drinking Fountain Asso- ciation, which was held in London at the Mansion House. The report stated that 497 fountains for human beings and 502 troughs for animals had been erected during the year. Over one thousand fouitains and troughs had now been built, and last year £1,5CO was paid for water. The receipts, exclusive of several legacies, amounted to £4,621, while the expenditure was £ 7,446. A Reuter's telegram from St. Petersburg announces* that the Arkadia Theatre in that city was burnt to the ground on Tuesday. Much personal injury has been caused in North Derbyshire by a bull which was sold on Monday at Bakewell Market te Mr Mellor, farmer, of Monyash. As it was being driven to Mr. Mellor's farm it knocked down Mrs. Mellor, fracturing her head, and then ran to Monsal Dale, attacking several persons on its way. he bull afterwards tossed a young man named Bridge, and was finally killed with an axe by a labourer. The Marquis of Lome, in mentioning the mixture of races in Canada, says that when he first expressed a wish to see a real full-blooded Indian, he was rather astonished when the Canadian, who at once undertook to gratify the wish, summoned the required real specimen of the aboriginal race by shouting "Come here, M'Donald Attention is drawn by the Registrar-General to the fact that last week was the first since November, 1879, in which no fatal case of small-pox was registered in London the average weekly number of deaths from this disease in the corresponding week of the last ten years was 22. In accordance with official instructions, arrange- ments have been made by the authorities for the protection of Mr. Gladstone, whose movements in London and else- where are now carefully guarded by experienced detective officers from the Criminal Investigation Department of the Metropolitan Police. We hear (says the Daily News) that the state of affairs in Armenia is so miserable that large numbers of the people are making preparations to emigrate to Russia. Depu- tations from many parts of the country have recently waited upon the Russian Consul at Van, who is an Armenian, in order to ask for his assistance. Some popular demonstrations have taken place before the residence of the Armenian Patriarch at Constantinople, in the hope that he would con- sent to withdraw, his resignation, but he refused to accede to the wish of his countrymen. An ingenious method of putting a political adver- sary out of the way has lately been tried in China. The Celestial Grand Secretary lost his mother, and his opponents, working on the national feeling of filial reverence, tried hard to force him to observe the full term of mourning-two years and three months—during which time he must live in strict retirement, and leave the game in their hands. The Emperor, however, objected to this view of the case, and limited the term of mourning to three months In London last week 2,470 births and 1,030 deaths were registered. Allowing for increase of population, the births were 3?, and the deaths 10S, below the average numbers in the corresponding week of the last ten years. The annual death-rate from all causes, which had been equal to 17-9 and 18'6 per 1,000 in the two preceding weeks, declined to 17'5.

THE MARKETS.