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INDIAN TROOPS FOR EGYPT.

SIR RIVERS WILSON ON THE EGYPTIAN…

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AMERICAN NEWS.

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CETEWAYO'S VISIT TO ENGLAND.

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jlMPESIAL PARLIAMENT.

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CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS.

A MILITARY VIEW OF AN ENGLISH…

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THE SALVATION ARMY AT THE…

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THE SALVATION ARMY AT THE ALEXANDRA PALACE. On Monday the 17th anniversary of the formation of the Salvation Army was celebrated at the Alex- andra Palace, when a large gathering took part in the programme issued from the head-quarters of the army. The palace and grounds had been specially engaged for the day by the promoters of the movement, and although the general public were admitted as usual, none of the ordinary amusements were practised in the grounds. Another edict absolutely forbidding the sale of intoxicating liquors in any part of the palace or grounds was rigidly enforced. During the whole of the afternoon mass meetings were held in different parts of the grounds, when ad- dresses were delivered. These were received with much enthusiasm, and were interspersed with the singing of hymns, set to the popular secular tunes of the day, and accompanied by instrumental music of many kinds, the German concertina being the reign- ing favourite. In the evening the grand march-past took place, when the whole of the "troops," accompanied by their band and flagbearers, marched round the race- course in view of General" Booth and Mrs. Booth, each battalion firing their volley of cheers in pass- ing the" General" on the signal being given from the stand. In the procession numerous country corps, attended by their respective bands took part, together with an Australian detachment, and the members of an Indian expedition about to start for India, the latter being attired in uniform suitable for a tropical climate. The programme also comprised delivery of an address by Mrs. Booth in the theatre, an exhibition of trophies in the concert hall, and concluding with a musical thanksgiving in the nave of the palace, led by the great organ, with all the brass and other bands in attendance. The day's proceedings were characterised by a great deal of religious enthusiasm, and were marked by the most perfect order and decorum. The number present was estimated at about 30,000. In the course of the proceedings General" Booth read the following letter, which his wife had received from the Queen "Windsor Castle, June 30, 1882. "Madam,—I am commanded by the Queen to ac- knowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th inst., and to assure you that her Majesty learns with much satisfaction that you have, with other members of your Society, been successful in your efforts to win many thousands to the ways of temperance, virtue, and religion. "I regret, however, to have to inform you that her Majesty cannot contribute to the fund you are now endeavouring to raise for the purchase of the Grecian Theatre.—I have the honour to be, Madam, your obedient servant." (Signed) "H F. PONSONBY. "Mrs. Booth." The Daily Telegraph, in a descriptive account of the day's proceedings, says After the reading of this gracious missive, he called I Long life and salva- tion to the Queen,' a sentiment that evoked loud cries of 'Amen' and 'Alleluia.' The 'General' also read a letter from Sir T-Tsnry Ponsonby to him- self, thanking him, in the Queen's name, for a book he had sent to her Majesty. In the midst of his speech, telling of the pecuniary help which had reached him during the day, money came rolling in, some in pence, some in shillings, some in gold and notes. This was a repetition, on a larger scale, of what had been going on all day. Money was collected, in the circus and elsewhere, in sheets, spread out to receive it. Halfpence chinked against sovereigns and it was said that a roll of notes, to the amount of a hundred pounds, was placed in the hands of one of the Messieurs Booth. But the most telling of the eloquent appeals, not to the pocket but to the heart, was the address delivered by Mrs. Booth in the theatre. This lady, who has her heart in her voice, is one of the most impressive of modern orators. The responses which met her deeply pathetic though hopeful periods were the same that had been heard throughout the day. 'Amen' and 'Alleluia' came forth as before; but they came with a profounder feeling, n more intense acquiescence and sympathy. Hearers started to their feet to utter these approving cries; and sank back as with a sense of blissful relief. There is something satisfying, if not convincing, in Mrs. Booth's oratory. It would probably lose in verbal repetition; and an exact report might be like showing a rocket-stick, and asking the beholder to imagine therefrom the rocket's climbing splendour in the dark night-air. General Booth' may and does command the attention of his hearers but his wife holds them spell-bound."

THE PARCELS POST.

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SUFFERINGS AT SEA:

THE LATE FLOODS IN TRAVANCORE.

THE LATE GENERAL GARIBALDI.

AN AESTHETIC FARM.

EPITOME OF NEWS. Evw

THE MARKETS.