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INDIAN TROOPS FOR EGYPT.

SIR RIVERS WILSON ON THE EGYPTIAN…

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AMERICAN NEWS.

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CETEWAYO'S VISIT TO ENGLAND.

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jlMPESIAL PARLIAMENT.

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In the HOUSE OF LORDS, July 4, the Duke of Argyll moved the second reading of the Parliamentary Oaths Act Amend- ment Bill. To this Lord Carnarvan proposed an amendment declaring that nothing had arisen in the ")roceedings of the House which made it expedient at this time to propose a change in the existing Parliamentary oath. y The Archbishop of "Canterbury opposed and the Earl of Aberdeen supported the Bill. Their lordships divided, when the Bill was rejected by 138 to 62. Several Bills were advanced a stage, and their Lordships adjourned at ten minutes to seven o'clock. THE CRISIS IN EGYPT. In the HOUSE OF COMMONS at the Morning Sitting, Mr. Gladstone, in answer to Mr. O'Kelly, who asked whether the Government would give an engagement that no act of hostility by British troops should be undertaken in Egypt without the sanction of Parliament, said it was not in his power to give such an assurance, but that while this country had in Egypt some claims and interests of her own which she could not forego, the great object of the Govern- ment in their policy had been to bring the united authority of Europe to bear for the settlement of the Egyptian diffi- culty. Replying to Mr. Ashmead Bartlett, Mr. Gladstone further stated that the Conference, having resolved that its pro- ceedings should be secret, any accounts of them that might transpire were not to be taken as authentic. The Confer- ence, he added, had also agreed that its members should request their respective Governments to maintain secrecy in like manner, and, therefore, he could not enter into the subject of its deliberations. URGENCY OF BUSINESS. Mr. Gladstone moved that the Orders of the Day be post- poned till after the notice of motion relating to public busi- ness, and the motion was carried by 391 to 20. The right hon. gentleman next rose and declared that the Prevention of Crime Bill being urgent, it is important to the public interest that it should be proceeded with without delay, and he moved that the state of public busi- ness is urgent. Another division was challenged by Irish members on this motion, when it was carried by 402 to 19. Thereupon the Speaker stated that urgency having now been declared by the House, he desired to lay on the table certain rules which he had framed for the regulation of business under that condition of affairs. These rules, he explained, were substantially the same as those which he had framed last session, and which were for some time in operation, with the addition of one relating to proceedings in Committee. SECESSION OF IRISH MEMBERS. Mr. M'Carthy asked for the indulgence of the House while he stated that the hon. member who usually acted with him had agreed to the following resolution -—" That, inasmuch as the Irish Parliamentary party have been ex- pelled from the House of Commons under the threat of physical force during the consideration of a measure affecting the vital rights and liberties of Ireland, and as the Government during the enforced absence of Irish mem- bers from the House have passed material portions of that measure through Committee, thus depriving the repre- sentatives of the Irish people of the right to discuss and vote upon coercive proposals for Ireland, we, therefore hereby resolve to take no further part in the proceed- ings of the Committee on the Coercion Bill (Ministerial cheers), and we cast upon the Government the sole re- sponsibility for the Bill which has been urged through the House of Commons by force, violence, and subterfuge"- (cries of "Order" and "Withdraw ")- and which, when passed "— The Speaker: The hon. memjber is importing matter of controversy into the statement he is making. Mr. M'Carthy: "And which, when passed into law, will be devoid of moral force and will not be a constitutional act of Parliament." Several Irish members then arose and left the House amid cheers from the Ministerial benches, but some half dozen Irish members remained, including Messrs. R. Power, Metge, Callan, and Biggar. The House then went into Committee on the Prevention of Crime (Ireland) Bill which occupied until the time for adjournment. At the Evening Sitting the consideration of the remaining new Clauses was resumed, and the Bill at length passed into Committee. The House was counted out at a quarter past one o'clock. In the HOUSE OF COMMONS, July 5, answering a question from Sir R. Cross, who asked whether it was true that, not- withstanding the remonstrances of the English Admiral, earthworks commanding the harbour of Alexandria are being rapidly pushed forward, Sir C. Dilke said that further instructions have been given to Admiral Seymour which are sufficient to meet any emergency that may arise. THE ARREARS BILL. Mr. Gladstone, in moving that the Chairman do leave the Chair, in order to go into committee on the Arrears Bill, said he was satisfied that je2,000,000 would satisfy the obligation incurred under it; but he did not think Parliament should exclude from view the possibility of a demand beyond that sum. He should consequently think it his duty to proceed with his proposal to pro- vide half a million from the Consolidated Fund in case the estimated yield of Church Surplus Fund were not sufficient. He went on to show that the need of the Bill being passed at once was urgent. He thought it had the most important bearing upon the peace and Uri security of Ireland, for which nothing was more necessary than the prompt and speedy settlement of this question. Mr. Chaplain moved, That this House, while willing, in case of emergency, to grant money from public funds for purposes which it believes are for the best interests of Ire- land, declines to proceed with a measure which imposes taxation for objects which, in its opinion, must tend to demoralise the people of that country." Mr. A. Arnold supported, and Colonel Harcourt opposed the Bill. Colonel Colthurst, who supported the Bill, preferred pay- ment of arrears by loan instead of by gift. The discussion was continued by Sir W. Barttelot, Mr- Dillon, Mr. A. J. Balfour, Dr. I^ons, Mr. Mulholland, Major O'Beirne, and Mr. Stanhope. Mr. Trevelyan defended the calculations made by the Government as to the amount of arrears that would come under the Bill. But for the Bill much of the arrears now due would never reach the landlords' pockets. As to its admini- stration, he stated that of the 78,700 applications for fixing fair rents in the Land Courts, 21,511 had been settled, and the settlements were now taking place at the rate of 4,000 a month, so that it was calculated that all the arrears would be overtaken by August next year The Bill gave the land court power to delegate their adminis- trative functions in respect of this Bill to persons whom they considered sufficiently qualified for the purpose; and in this way the Government hoped that its operation would be as prompt as effective. The debate was suspended at 5.45. Before the House separated, Sir S. Northcote, referring to the state of affairs reported to exist at Alexandria, asked whether Admiral Seymour had authority to act in case of necessity. Mr. Gladstone replied that since the House met the Go- vernment had not received any intelligence of a disquieting character, and he repeated the answer given by Sir C. Dilke earlier in the sitting. The House adjourned at six o'clock.

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