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INDIAN TROOPS FOR EGYPT.

SIR RIVERS WILSON ON THE EGYPTIAN…

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AMERICAN NEWS.

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CETEWAYO'S VISIT TO ENGLAND.

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jlMPESIAL PARLIAMENT.

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jlMPESIAL PARLIAMENT. In the BOUSE OF LORDS, July 3, the Royal Assent was given by Commission to 43 public and private Acts. CSTEWAYO'S VISIT TO ENGLAND. Earl Cadogan called attention to the papers lately pre- sented to Parliament with reference to the proposed visit of Cetewayo to England. It was impossible, he said, to realise What would be the result of the action the Government propoaetto take. (Hear, hear.) Cetewayo himself, how- ever, left the Government in no doubt as to what be expected to be the result of his visit. Sir Hercules Robinson also informed the Secretary of State in One of his despatches tha tCetewayo's sole object in under- taking a sea voyage, which he greatly dreaded, was to secure his restoration to his crown and his authority; and that if the visit did not attain that result the c nsequence would OnlJ be to enhance the painfulness of the ex-king's position. The dangers and difficulties attending the visit must have been present to and appreciated by his noble friend. Lord Stanley of Alderley considered that the visit of Cete. Wayo would be of advantage to the settlement of South Africa, and to the captive king himself. The Duke of Somerset asked why it was Cetewayo was to be brought over to this country if he was to be sent back again. The Earl of Kimberley denied that he had shown any vacillation In the matter of the ex-king's visit. From the time it was first determined he should come here, there had been no change of purpose, but there had been some delay lor the purpose of having inquiries made of a legal character, and also as to the suitability of this climate. In consequence, too, of a telegram from Sir H. Bulwer, a postponement had taken place; but later on, after watching the course of events in Zululand, that official sent him special in- formation which led him to the conclusion that there was really no good reason for further delay. It ought to be berne in mind what the actual position of Cetywayo was. Many persons fancied that he was a criminal suffering punishment for his crimes, but he was nothing of the Kind Cetywayo was a captive king, whom they had de- throned. Be had never concealed his opinion that he considered the Zulu war unjust and unnecessary; and that being so, it undoubtedly became a very serious responsibility to allow him to languish in prison and re- fuse him permission to lay his case before the Govern- ment. That was the first consideration which had weighed With him in consenting to the visit. Undoubtedly they had further to consider the very important question of so set- tling the affairs of Zululand as to ensure the safety and wel- fare of the colonies adjoining. It was asked whether the Government intended to send Cetewayo back to Zululand. H {answer to that was that if any decision had been come to on the point it would have been plainly announced before this time. The position of affairs was that the Government had been forced to the conclusion that the present condition of Zululand was exceedingly Unsatisfactory under the settlement made by Sir Garnet Wolbeley. There were two alternatives-either to take steps Which would virtually, if not nominally, be the annexation Of the country, or to re-constitute some native author- ity strong enough to preserve order in that country. Sir H. Bulwer when he went out was instructed to examine Carefully into this point. He was a man whose judg- ment from his ability, experience, and special know- ledge, mnst have great weight. He (the Earl of Kimberley) had not thought it right to -come to any final deci- sion wtthont having before him that gentleman's opinion and report. The report had been delayed beyond the ex- pected time, because the critical state of affairs in Natal had targety occupied his attention. He had urged Sir Henry, howf ver, to send in a full report as soon as possible, and when the Government received it they would come to a conclusion as to the changes to be made in Zululand. Lord Cranbrook wanted to know by what authority Cete- wayo would be held captive. The Earl of Kimberley explained that the law officers held that Cetewayo was a prisoner of war, and that he would re- main a prisoner of war to whatever place he was taken. They thought it right, therefore, to leave the matter in the hands of the Cape Government. The Earl of Carnarvon heard with regret the decision at Which the Government had arrived. The experiment of bringing African princes to this country with a view to in- doctrinate them with EngUsh views and send them back to their country more capable of carrying out English policy had been tried more than once, and he could not recall a single, case in which it had succeeded. A conversation followed, in which Lords Granville, Chelms- ford, Betaore, and Cairns took part, and in which the nobie and learned ex-Chancellor expressed a doubt that Cetywayo would be a prisoner of war in this country. The subject then dropped. The Supreme Court of Judicature Act Amendment Bill was read a second time. The otherbusiness on the paper having been disposed of, their Lordships adjourned at a quarter past seven o'clock. In the HOUSE OF COMMONS, Mr. Childers stated, in reply to Sir E Watkin, that he had received a voluminous report from the military authorities on the subject of the proposed Channel Tunnel, and it would be considered by the Govern- ment before any final decision was arrived at. In the mean- time he could only advise the hon. baronet to comply with the notice given him by the Board of Trade to discontinue the operations for the tunnel. THE SUSPENSION OF IRISH MEMBERS. A large number of questions were addressed to the Speaker on points of order arising out of the proceedings on Saturday last Mr. Callan first asked the Chairman of Ways and Means -Whether he bad supplied to certain newspapers an editorial paragraph stating that the suspension of 16 Irish members Was based on their conduct during 19 nights of debate on the Crime Prevention Bill. The Chairman answered in the negative. p In answer to questions from Mr. Labouchere and Sir H. Wolff, the Speaker said the Chairman of Committees was entitled by immemorial practice to invite another member to take the chair in his place and exercise his authority. He Was not aware of any occasion when the Chairman of Ways and Means had voted in Committee, but he could not say thjit he was iiotentitled to do so. The Speaker himself was soentitlefl. The last question grew out of the fact that Mr. Playfair had voted once on Saturday according to the division list, but had Stated that he had no recollection of the circumstance. In answer to Mr. Onslow, the Speaker said that a combination for obstructing business came, in his opinion, within the Standing order of the 31st of January, 1881. THE CONDUCT OF MR. O'DONNELL. The conduct of Mr. O'Donnell on Saturday towards the Chairman was brought forward by Mr. Gladstone, who, before making any motion, invited Mr. O'Donnell to offer any explanation he might desire as to the epithets he had Used. This, however, the hen. member declined to do, stating that he would wait to hear the accusation that was to be preferred against him. Mr. Gladstone said that the records of the House, show- ing that the member for Dungarvan had stigmatized the action of the Chairman as an infamy," sufficiently indi- cated the nature of the grave charge" hich had to be met lIe moved that Mr. 0 Donnell be suspended from the service of the Ronae for fourteen days for his misconduct towards the Chair. Mr. adonnell denied the accuracy of the words imputed to him, but admitted that in his 11 apostrophe to the Chair there might have been some irregularity. Having been absent from the House the whole of Friday night, he thought he had been unjustly and unfairly suspended, and in includ- ing him in the list of the 16 the Chairman, he affirmed, had "sinned against all the traditions of his office." By those traditions every member supposed to be transgress- ing the rules of order was entitled to be fully and fairly Varolii by the Chair before any penal proceeding was taken against him. In asserting, as he did on Saturday under pro- Vocation, that be had been "foully" suspended, he meant to express his firm convtotion that no English or Sftfttch member would have been treated as he, as an Irish member, had been..He then went on, in some detail, amid occasional manifestations of impatience, to show that his slight and rare contributions to the debates on the Crimes Bill did not justify ihe Chairman in designating him as a systematic obstructor. The Speaker, interposing, reminded him, more than once, that he was drawing very largely on the indulgence of the House, the question now before which was not the conduct Of the Chairman, but the hon, member's own conduct. Mr. O'Donnell then alleged that the Chairman had not acted upon circumstances within his own knowledge, but upon the false and feloniously misleading reports made to him as to what had occurred in his absence. This eliciting loud cries of "Order "and another interposition from the Chair, Mr. O'Donnell explained that he attributed the false reports in question to the Government, who had been the cowardly inciters of the tyranny practised against Irish members. Mr. O'Donnell, having then withdrawn, in obedience to the order of the Speaker, while his conduct was being con- sidered, Mr. Playfair explained that the responsibility for what had occurred in connexion with the suspension of the six- teen members rested with him exclusively. He had not mentioned bis intentions in the matter to any of the Minis- ters, nor had he acted on any reports made to him by others. He had felt it his painful duty to the Heuse to "name" the sixteen members upon clear evidence that Obstruction was increasing and he regretted to have had to report to the House insulting language used, no doubt, in heat. Mr. Labonehere, wishing to temper justice with mercy, moved, as an amendment, that the Chairman of Commit- tees having named Mr. O'Donnell for obstructing the busi- ness of Parliament, he having been absent during a greater Portion of the sitting when the offence was committed, and not having received any warning from the Chair, the House Is not prepared to take notice of the language imputed to him, and passes to the other orders of the day. Mr. Callan seconded the amendment; but on objection, taken by Mr. Gladstone, the Speaker pronounced it Irregular. Alter some remarks from Mr. Gorst, Sir S. Northcote expressed regret that Mr. O'Donnell had not availed himself of the opportunity of making a state- ment or offering an apology before the House proceeded to tsousider the case. In his speech that night the hon. JJjember had to some extent altered the charge against a»ei now said that the words in question applied cot to the Chairman himself, but to those *ho had misled him. The offensive expression had, Jjowever, been neither retracted nor apologized for, Joe language used was such as the House could not allow pass without serious notice, especially considering necessity of supporting the authority of its presiding Officers. Mr Cowen moved, as an amendment, that the House de- fines to express an opinion on Mr. O'Donnell's language, passes to the next order of the day. Sir J, flay supported this amendment, believing that Mr. J?Donnel! had used the objectionable epithets "interjec- wotially and had not meant to apply them to the Chair. «, ^lr. PsarneH and Mr. Healy opposed the motion, urging Jhat until the House had had the opportunity of expressing **? opinion on the grounds of the suspension, it ought to Ithhotd its judgment on Mr. O'Donnell. i6 OUa. division, the amendment was rejected by 199 to and Sir. Gladstone's original motion carried by 181 to 33. THE URGENCY RESOLUTION „Mr. Gladstone afterwards moved, in accordance with J^noMce given on Saturday, that the resolution of February rj relating to the urgency in the basiness of the be revived, supporting it on the ground that 28 days heen occupied by the Committee on the Crime Preven- *Y?11 that it was extremely necessary to g«t on with i especially the Arrears Bill, and also heoause »i the temble state of Ireland. Mr. Parnell moved an amendment for dispensing with the necessity of a three-fourths majority in order to create a state of urgency. It would, he thought, be very difficult for the Government to obtain urgency on that condition in favour of the Arrears Bill, Sir S. Northcote, while ready to support the motion of the Prime Minister, expressed a hope that care would be taken to preserve to the House due facilities for the discussion of any important questions of foreign or domestic policy which might arise. A short discussion followed, and eventually the amendment was rejected by 184 to 41. The discussion was renewed on an amendment by Lord Percy for confining urgency to the Crimes Bill, which was negatived, and Mr. Gladstone's original resolution was car- ried by 259 to 31. The House again went into Committee on the Prevention of Crime Bill, which occupied the remainder of the sitting. Progress having been reported, the other orders of the day were disposed of, and the House was counted out at twenty- five minutes to two o'clock.

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