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DRINKING FOUNTAINS AND CATTLE…

ABSTRACT of the CENSUS RETURNS.

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THE STORM ON TUESDAY NIGHT.

THE POPE ON THE ASSASSINATION…

THE RUSSIAN HARVEST.

I iDEATH OF PRESIDENT GARFIELD'S…

DEATH OF DR. CUMMING.

PROPOSED UNDERGROUND RAILWAY…

Pisallraams fiMigem

----IJYfPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

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jSUNDAY CLOSING.

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MR. GLADSTONE and MR. BRADLAUGH.

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SIR S. WATERLOW ON TECHNICAL…

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SIR S. WATERLOW ON TECHNICAL EDUCATION. In London, on Tuesday night, Sir Sydney Water low* Bart., M.P., supported by Mr. Samuel Morley, M.P., Professor Ayrton, and others, presided at the annual meeting and distribution of prizes in connection with the Artisans' Institute, Castle-street. The annual report, which gave a satisfactory account of the institute's work, was read by Mr. Hodgson Pratt, after which the prizes were presented to the successful competitors. The chairman, addresing the assemblage, remarked that the fact of his having served a seven years' apprenticeship to a technical trade near to the place where they had met was ample warrant for his say- ing that he sympathised with the numbers of young people who were now undergoing their apprenticeship. Nowadays in institutions such as this advantages were to be derived which could not be gained some fifty years ago, and it was to be hoped that these advantages would, in some measure, compensate for the difficulties which beset young people learning trades. Fifty years ago the apprentice was brought up in the master's family. He lived under the same roof with his master, who took every interest in teaching him the details of the trade or craft which he had espoused. In those days the workshops were not so large as now, and the work was commenced and completed within such an area that the apprentice could see the entire manipulation. In latter times, however, division of labour had changed all this, so much so that the young man apprenticed to a certain trade saw only a portion of the working of that handicraft, and thus failed to comprehend the various relations of the parts of the whole to one another. Herein this institute, and such of its class, did good service, by filling up a gap, and imparting that knowledge which never could have been acquired in the workshop. He (the chairman) had a distinct recollection of the Exhibition of 1851, at which time an impression seized him that the working people of this country wanted some teaching with regard to their various trades. Technical education he believed to be but in its infancy in this country. Inasmuch as they had a great deal to do to keep up with the foreigner, and give to their youth the same advantages as the people of other lands possessed, he hoped the national Government would some day give a grant towards this purpose. He held the question to be a national one and, being such, institutes similar to this were needed in every large town throughout the kingdom, so that the artisan classes should be educated up to the position which they ought to occupy.