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DRINKING FOUNTAINS AND CATTLE…

ABSTRACT of the CENSUS RETURNS.

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THE STORM ON TUESDAY NIGHT.

THE POPE ON THE ASSASSINATION…

THE RUSSIAN HARVEST.

I iDEATH OF PRESIDENT GARFIELD'S…

DEATH OF DR. CUMMING.

PROPOSED UNDERGROUND RAILWAY…

Pisallraams fiMigem

----IJYfPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

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jSUNDAY CLOSING.

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MR. GLADSTONE and MR. BRADLAUGH.

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MR. GLADSTONE and MR. BRADLAUGH. A correspondence which has recently passed between Mr. Gladstone and Mr. Bradlaugh relative to the exclusion of the latter from the House of Commons has been made public. On June 20 Mr. Gladstone, replying to a letter from Mr. Bradlaugh, declines to grant him an interview, thinking it better that their communications should be "carried on by writing on this particular subject." In answer to a further letter from Mr. Bradlaugh, Mr. Gladstone wrote as follows 10, Downing-street, Whitehall, June 24. Dear Sir,—I have received your letter of the 22nd, and can express no surprise and make no complaints at the urgency of your inquiry whether the Government intend this year to pass the Parliamentary Oaths Bills. I must also acknowledge the very considerate manner in which you have endeavoured to adapt your measures to the exigencies of public business. Before answering your question, however, I have much to consider; and this especially-that a question of paramount importance to the empire at present absorbs all the available time of the Government in the House of Commons; that it is likely to occupy a number of days, still very undefined, but sure to be large and that we are not as yet able to take any definite resolution as to our eventual course of action with respect to measures of much public moment now before Parliament, even in cases where they were announced in the Speech from the Throne at the opening of the session. So soon as we are able to approach the question of our future course with reference to these measures, I shall also call the attention of my colleagues to your inquiry, and shall be prepared in due course to give you a reply.—I have the honour to be, dear Sir, your faithful servant, C. Bradlaugh, Esq., M.P." W. E. GLADSTONE." In another letter, dated July 2, Mr. Gladstone in- timated that the Cabinet on that day had concluded not to proceed further with the motion for leave to bring in a Bill dealing with Parliamentary oaths. The correspondence closed with a letter from Mr. Brad- laugh, in which he said that the last letter of Mr. Gladstone showed by its silence that the Government were unable or unwilling to enforce the law in his case.

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SIR S. WATERLOW ON TECHNICAL…