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(Dm: yonkit Covrisp0nl1e.it.

ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION OF…

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In a telegram from New York on Saturday, the Corre- spondent of the Daily News says;- This city was overwhelmed with amazement and sorrow when the news came from Washington that the President had been shot. The first and overpdwering feeling was of bewilderment. That in a time of profound peace, in a period of the greatest prosperity ever known in a country, a President of so amiable a character, who had no bitter personal enemies, should be stricken down by the hand of an assassin was utterly in- comprehensible. Hardly any, one believed the report when it was first heard, but the bulletin boards of the newspapers, and the announcement which appeared in every office receiving stock quotations, quickly gave unwelcome con- firmation. The excitement aroused was rarely violent in its demonstrations. The prevailing sentiment was one of profound sorrow. It was asserted soon after the first news of the tragedy that the President was dead. The grief caused by the sense of the great loss to the nation gave way to hope when this statement was contra- dicted and the wires brought word that the wounds might not prove fatal. Further encouraging despatches were received, and people began to think that the earlier accounts had greatly exaggerated the matter. As the afternoon wore on, and the news in regard to the President's condition grew more and more ominous, the ex- citement grew correspandingly intense. The crowd in the streets increased, and people waited breathlessly for addi- tional information, Park-row, where all the morning news- paper offices are, was almost a solid throbbing mass of vehicles, and men, vomen, and children. The crowd was enormous. The street was filled with vehicles, but above the heavy rumble of the wheels could be heard on all sides the cries of the newsboys. Papers brought lu<rh prices. At all the bulletins were large crowds, and the policemen were unable to keep them from obstructing the pavements. Men were very quiet and orderly, and talked in low tones of the tragedy and its probable and possible effects. The excitement was too deep to display itseif in a noisy way, and the sadness of the people was too genuine and heartfelt to expend itself in loud talk. There were men of all shades of political opinions in the crowds which surged around the bulletins, frat they all had a one sentiment in common upon the great crime which had been committed.

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RECEPTION OF THE NEWS IN LONDON.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.