Hide Articles List

14 articles on this Page

[No title]

(Dm: yonkit Covrisp0nl1e.it.

ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION OF…

[No title]

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

Guiteau is said to be a Canadian Frenchman by birth, and has been considered by people who knew him in Chioago and other places as erratic or half crazy. He has been in Washington since March, and was a persistent applicant for the Consulship at Marseilles.—General Grant says of him :— I met him in the Fifth Avenue Hotel at the close of the last presidential campaign. He wanted me to sign a paper recommending him as a proper person to appoint as Minister for Austria. I knew nothing about him. My son told me that Guiteau was a lawyer in Chicago, and was sup- posed to be half crazy. He was no doubt crazy when he shot the President, and I attach no political importance to his act. Under these circumstances it was the act of a cowardly assassin, who had been disappointed in his search for office. Guiteau evidently believed that he was a man of great importance to the Republican party, and the defeat of his aims must have unbalanced his mind. He told me that he was engaged to a young woman worth one million dollars, and that he should obtain the appointment he was looking for it if I would join Henry Ward Beecher and others in seeking it for him. I refused to sign his papers. I told my servant not to allow him to enter my parlours. He sub- sequently forced his way in one day, but I refused to talk with him, and dismissed him speedily. I regret this sad occurrence from the bottom of my heart." Mrs. Sarah V. E. White, a lady in charge of the waiting- room at the station, was the person who first reached the President after he was shot. She thus describes the attempt and arrest of Guiteau "I saw the whole thing. A man came in from the door, entering the ladies' room from the main waiting room just as the President entered the middle door from B-street. When he bad approached within five feet of the President he fired, aiming, I thought, at the President's heart, and missed him. The President did not seem to notice him, but walked right on past the man. He fired again, and the President fell. He fell right at the turn ef the second row qf seats. I was the first to reach him and lifted up his head. A janitor rushed in and called the police. held him until some men came and lifted him up. He did not speak to me or to any one until a young man, who I think was his son, came. After he had vomited I think he said something to him. When he was lifted upon a mattress he spoke or groaned. The man who shot him said nothing. No words at all passed between them. The man walked deliberately out of the centre door where somebody headed him off. He turned and started back the way he came, and was seized at the door by the police. I have seen the man once or twice before. One time in particular I noticed him, a few days ago. He promenaded up and down, just as he did to-day, wiping his face, and ap- parently excited. I thought he was waiting for some friends. This morning he waited here half-an-hour, walking up and down. There were few people in the room when the shot fired; all the passengers had gone out. I think there was a gentleman standing near the door.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

RECEPTION OF THE NEWS IN LONDON.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

EPITOME OF NEWS.