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(Dm: yonkit Covrisp0nl1e.it.

ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION OF…

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In a telegram from Philadelphia, dated July 4, tb Corre- spondent of The Times says America has passed a sorry Fourth o" July, the ;errible event at Washington restraining the ordinary celebrtion of Independence Day. The public feel more like holdir; a fast than a jubilee. On Sunday in all the churches prayers were offerei up for the President's recovery more than one clegyman denouncing the assassination as the outcome of that actious political spirit which now dominates, more especiallyin New York. The universal demand is that the Senate Jontest there should end, either by electing the Senators or djourn- ing the Legislature. The national salute usually fired at sunrise in Wasington on Independence Day was omitted to-day. The cit is un- usually quiet. The customary firing of guns and packers has been almost entirely abandoned. Crowds from ft early hour gathered around the White House enclosure, irtuiring as to the President's condition. Much anxiety to learn the President's condition bs been shown throughout Canada, and prayers for his recovry were offered in the English Cathedral in Quebec on Sunday Inquiries as to the President's condition, with mesages of sympathy, have been received from the King of Swden and Norway, the President of the Council of Miniters of Roumania, and from almost all the American Miniters to the European Co arts. The chief of the Treasury detectives, Mr. Brooks, rho has been carefully examining Guiteau's case, expreies hi epinion that Guiteau had no accomplices and that b alone was concerned in the crime. He declines to say whiher or not Guiteau, in his opinion, is insane. The Waatington prison officials describe him as eccentric, but not insac. In every statement which he has made, Guiteau flclares that the plot was conceived and executed by himsellilone. He asks all his visitors how the President is, exposing regret that he is not dead and wishing that he hi put another ball into him to end his sufferings. His only motive, he says, was to cause the retirement of Gtieral Garfield and to have a "Stalwart" for President. teing asked how he had rested, Guiteau said, "Thiaistheirst rest I have had for six weeks. While this thing was en-ny mind I could not sleep. Now it is over my only wish is tiat he may not recover, making my act fruitless. My mÍlld would be perfectly at rest if he died. I do not fear the con- sequences." M. Grévy, at Paris, has sent the following telegram to ■. Mrs. GarfieldAccept the expression of our deepest sympathy." Telegrams of condolence continue to arrive, including messages from the Emperor of Japan, Mr. Parnell in the name of the Irish members, and various foreign Ministers on behalf of their respective Governments. Despatches from all the chief towns report a very quiet Fourth of July, with little or none of the usual celebrations, the customary national salute being also omitted. The brother-in-law of Guiteau asserts that the latter has been several times examined by physicians, who pronounced him to be insane. The same person states that his insanity took the form of imagining himself to be a great man.

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RECEPTION OF THE NEWS IN LONDON.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.